Current courses list

Many faculty members and lecturers teach classes related to food and its supporting complex systems (water, soil, climate, energy, microbiology, economics, financial engineering, literature, history, psychology, sociology, religion, policy, politics, etc.). This list of relevant classes, using the Rights of Nature framework, is broad — and ongoing. Not all courses are taught every semester; some courses require advance approval. Check the PU course catalog for specifics. Please do write with additions.

UPDATED FOR FALL 2018-19

AMS 306 / GHP 411: Issues in American Public Health: Leslie E. Gerwin 

The study of public health is an interdisciplinary inquiry involving issues of politics, policy, history, science, law, philosophy, ethics, geography, sociology, environmental studies, and economics, among others. Students will examine the government’s role in assuring and promoting health, through the exploration of issues on America’s “public health agenda,” such as epidemic response, tobacco use, the impact of weight on health, mandatory vaccination, disease prevention, and violence. In doing so, they will consider the impact of race, income, gender, place and environment, education, capitalism and democracy on health outcomes.

ARC 519: Climate Change, Adaptation and Urban Design: Guy J.P. Nordenson 

Climate change adaptation is a pressing and difficult challenge to urban design, ecological and engineering planning theory and practice. It is clear that architects, planners, engineers and designers have an important role to help cities contend with climate adaptation. This seminar reviews the general state of science and practice of climate change and adaptation with a primary focus on the United States. It looks to the work of Frederick Law Olmsted for some of the theoretical basis of developing an approach to climate adaptation that is democratic and progressive and evaluate the impediments which restrict change.

CEE 334 / WWS 452 / ENV 334 / ENE 334 Global Environmental Issues: Denise L. Mauzerall 

This course examines a set of global environmental issues including population growth, ozone layer depletion, climate change, air pollution, the environmental consequences of energy supply and demand decisions and sustainable development. It provides an overview of the scientific basis for these problems and examines past, present and possible future policy responses. Individual projects, presentations, and problem sets are included.

CEE 471 / GEO 471 / URB 471 Introduction to Water Pollution Technology: Peter R. Jaffé 

An introduction to the science of water quality management and pollution control in natural systems; fundamentals of biological and chemical transformations in natural waters; indentification of sources of pollution; water and wastewater treatment methods; fundamentals of water quality modeling.

CEE 587 / ENV 587  Ecohydrology: Amilcare M. Porporato 

A description of the hydrologic mechanisms that underlie ecological observations. The space-time dynamics of soil-plant-atmosphere is studied at different temporal and spatial scales. A review is done of the role of environmental fluctuations in the distribution of vegetation. Emphasis is made in the dynamics of soil moisture. The signatures revealing fractal structures in landscapes and vegetation are reviewed as result of self-organizing dynamics. Unifying concepts in the processes responsible for these signatures will be studied with examples from hydrology and ecology.

* EAS 225 / ANT 323 Japanese Society and Culture: Amy B. Borovoy 

During the decades after World War II, Japan became the world’s second largest economy and a highly productive, technologized society. While Americans once regarded Japan as a land of “corporate warriors,” today Japan has become known for its popular culture, critiques of environmental destruction, and gentler variety of capitalism. We explore key social issues including gender, labor, affect, sports, media, popular culture, biopolitics, law, demography and population control.

EAS 548 / ANT 548  Quest for Health: Contemporary Debates on Harm, Medicine, and Ethics: Amy B. Borovoy 

The course considers the ethical predicaments of medicine and public health in the context of global inequality, aging, and medical entrepreneurialism. Increasingly sophisticated forms of bio-medical care shape our lives and alter social relationships, producing both harm and benefit. New medical treatments are generated continually through research and clinical trials. Topics include: ethics of population health; chronicity vs. acute disease; anthropology of capitalism; big food, big agriculture; environmental toxins; embodied health movements; citizen science; life extension; pharmaceuticalization; and moves to “demedicalize” health.

* ECO 331 Economics of the Labor Market: Orley C. Ashenfelter 

To provide a general overview of labor markets. Covering labor force participation, the allocation of time to market work, migration, labor demand, investment in human capital (education, on-the-job training, man-power training), discrimination, unions and unemployment. The course will also examine the impact of government programs (such as unemployment insurance, minimum wages, or a negative income tax) on the labor market.

ECO 332 / GHP 332 Economics of Health and Health Care: Kelly Noonan 

Health economics is a growing field of applied microeconomics and is an important aspect of public policy. This course explores the health care sector and health policy issues from an economic perspective. Microeconomics tools will be used to analyze the functioning of different pieces of the health care system. Topics will range from fundamental subjects, such as the demand for health, to more recent developments, such as mental health, child health and risky health behaviors. This course teaches an economic approach to studying the various polices that affect health and health behaviors.

ECO 406 Radical Markets: Glen Weyl 

Wealthy countries in the twenty-first century face a triple social crisis of rising inequality, economic stagnation, and failing political legitimacy; many observers blame free markets for these seemingly intractable problems. This course will explore the counter-intuitive idea that true free markets might actually be able to solve these problems by adopting radically new social institutions. These markets would upend property relations, traditional conceptions of democracy and international migration. We will critically interrogate such unconventional ideas and explore avenues for applying, disseminating and organizing around them.

ECO 520 / POL 577 Economics and Politics: Leeat Yariv 

Focused on analytical models of political institutions, this course is organized around canonical models and their applications. These include: voting models, menu auctions, models of reputation and cheap talk games. These models are used to explain patterns of participation in elections, institutions of congress, lobbying, payments to special interest groups and other observed phenomena.

ECO 531 Economics of Labor: Staff

An examination of the economics of the labor market, especially the forces determining the supply of and demand for labor, the level of unemployment, labor mobility, the structure of relative wages, and the general level of wages.

EEB 308 Conservation Biology: David S. Wilcove 

Students will learn to identify, understand, and (perhaps) reconcile conflicts between human activities such as farming, forestry, industry, and infrastructure development, and the conservation of species and natural ecosystems. We will also explore the role of biodiversity in providing critical ecosystem services to people. We will examine these topics in an interdisciplinary way, with a primary focus on ecology, but also including consideration of the economic and social factors underlying threats to biodiversity. In Fall 2018, the course will include an optional field trip to Florida for the duration of Fall break.

EEB 533 Topics in Ecology – Biodiversity: Origins and Maintenance: Staff

The causes of global patterns in plant and animal diversity remain a topic of debate just as when Wallace and Darwin defined the issue. This seminar seeks a new synthetic understanding of the topic via critical reviews of major papers on (1) macro-evolutionary patterns of species formation and loss as documented in the paleontological literature, (2) the causes and dynamics of speciation, (3) geographic (including latitudinal) patterns in species diversity, (4) allometric scaling of body size, abundance, productivity, etc. and diversity, and (5) analytical theories of interspecific interactions and species persistence/coexistence.

* EGR 488 Designing Ventures To Change the World: John D. Danner 

This course looks at global challenges reflected in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), e.g., widespread poverty, disease, gender inequality, poor water, inadequate housing and illiteracy, through the lens of entrepreneurial ventures, exploring whether and how entrepreneurs can meaningfully address those issues in ways that complement governmental and charitable initiatives. First, we will consider the SDGs themselves, second, we will focus on one issue in particular: coffee business.

ENE 318 / CBE 318 Fundamentals of Biofuels: José L. Avalos 

What are biofuels, and why are we making them? What are 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation biofuels? What is the controversy surrounding the food versus fuel debate? Will thermocatalysis or genetic engineering improve biofuel production? Can we make biofuels directly from light or electricity? These are some of the questions we will answer through engaging discussions, primary literature readings, and hands-on experience in making biofuels. In precept we will make bioethanol from corn (beer) or molasses (wine), biodiesel from cooking oil, and oil from algae. Grades are based on participation, an oral presentation, and three short lab reports.

ENG 574 Literature and Society – Global Perspectives on Environmental Justice in Literature and Film: Robert Nixon 

This interdisciplinary seminar in the environmental humanities explores imaginative and political responses to unequal access to resources and unequal exposure to risk during a time of widening economic disparity. To engage these concerns, we venture to India, the Caribbean, South Africa, France, Kenya, Nevada, the U.S. Northwest, Japan, the UK, Australia, Bolivia, and the Middle East. Issues we will address include: climate justice, the Anthropocene, water security, food security, deforestation, the commons and the politics of access, indigenous movements and cosmologies, and the environmentalism of the poor.

ENV 304 / ECO 328 / EEB 304 / WWS 455 Disease Ecology, Economics, and PolicyBryan T. Grenfell 

The dynamics of the emergence and spread of disease arise from a complex interplay between disease ecology, economics, and human behavior. Lectures will provide an introduction to complementarities between economic and epidemiological approaches to understanding the emergence, spread, and control of infectious diseases. The course will cover topics such as drug-resistance in bacterial and parasitic infections, individual incentives to vaccinate, the role of information in the transmission of infectious diseases, and the evolution of social norms in healthcare practices.

ENV 305 Topics in Environmental Studies – Building American Style: Land-Use Policies and Rules: Deborah E. Popper Frank J. Popper 

Americans have built and preserved an astounding variety of environments. The course examines the evolving complex of incentives and regulations that drove the choices of where and how places developed. It focuses on the emergence of land-use and environmental planning as a way to encourage or discourage growth and to mitigate or intensify its environmental, social, and economic effects.We will examine the latest tools for building and protecting the American landscape. Case studies include Southern California, New Haven, the American Great Plains, and others. Analysis will be from historical, policy-oriented, and predictive perspectives.

ENV 327 Investigating an Ethos of Sustainability at Princeton: Shana S. Weber 

Achieving sustained human and environmental health is a global priority given increasingly disruptive economic, social and environmental conditions. Evidence suggests that humanity is capable of producing sustainable technological and social solutions, but must do so between now and mid-century. This course explores social/ethical dimensions of the sustainability challenge through an evaluation of related ethics and psychology of social norms literature, and includes an exercise in proposing evidence-based solutions toward cultivating an ethos of sustainability on the Princeton campus as a demonstration-scale system.

* ENV 357 / AMS 457 / GSS 357 Empire of the Ark: The Animal Question in Film, Photography and Popular Culture: Anne McClintock 

This course explores the fascination with animals in film, photography and popular culture, engaging critical issues in animal and environmental studies. In the context of global crises of climate change and mass displacement, course themes include the invention of wilderness, national parks, zoos and the prison system; the cult of the pet; vampires, werewolves and liminal creatures; animal communication, emotions and rights; queering nature; race and strategies for environmental justice. How can rethinking animals help us rethink what it means to be human? How can we transform our relations with other species and the planet itself?

* ENV 359 New Directions in Environmental Humanities: Rachel L. Price 

In an era in which environmental science is routinely ignored by citizens and politicians alike, humanities’ approaches to the environment–including thinking critically, politically, aesthetically, and philosophically–are increasingly necessary. This course introduces students to cutting edge, recent scholarship in central themes in environmental humanities, from food studies to science fiction, from historical analyses of climate change to environmental racism, with case studies from the deserts, tropics, oceans, and beyond. Materials include essays, monographs, films, fiction, and visits by authors.

ENV 363 / ENG 337 Writing the Environment through Creative Nonfiction: Robert Nixon 

This workshop will expose participants to some of the most dynamic, adventurous environmental nonfiction writers while also giving students the opportunity to develop their own voices as environmental writers. We’ll be looking at the environmental essay, the memoir, opinion writing, and investigative journalism. In the process we’ll discuss the imaginative strategies deployed by leading environmental writers and seek to adapt some of those strategies in our own writing. Readings will engage urgent concerns of our time, like climate change, extinction, race, gender and the environment, and relations between humans and other life forms.

ENV 405 Meeting the Global Land Use Challenge: Timothy D. Searchinger 

People have plowed up, cut-down and otherwise heavily manipulated more than 75% of the world’s land, and the degree and extent of this manipulation continues to expand to meet rising demands for food and wood products. This course will explore the consequences for biodiversity and climate change, the drivers of change and scenarios for the future. Students will think through the complex issues behind conservation planning for biodiversity and gain understanding of what is known and not known about the global carbon cycle. Major class papers and a final presentation by each student will explore solutions.

* FRS 101 The Dirty South: Music, Words, and Memory: John W. Axcelson 

The United States has long cultivated an optimistic self-image: We are the new beginning, a people relieved from history; we are the prosperous, the victorious, the innocent, the forward-looking. As Americans, southerners feel the pull of these values, yet they also stand outside them- they carry the burden of history; they are the defenders of the indefensible, the poor, the rural, the defeated, the backward-looking. This seminar will explore the stories that southern culture tells about itself- what it remembers, what it forgets, how it reimagines its own history- paying special attention to the influence of place and history upon identity.

* FRS 107 Economics of Immigration in the US: Past and Present: Leah P. Boustan 

The United States is often seen as a land of opportunity for immigrants. Yet, both in the past and the present, heated debates about migration policy loom large in public discourse. This class will discuss major issues in the economics of immigration: who migrates; who returns home; processes of economic and cultural assimilation; and the effects immigration may have on the economic opportunities of native-born workers. We will consider two main eras of US immigration history, the Age of Mass Migration from Europe (1850 -1920) and the recent period of migration from Asia and Latin America, along with U.S. border closings in the 1920s.

* FRS 115 What Makes for a Meaningful Life? A Search: Ellen B. Chances 

With the pressures and frenzied pace of contemporary American life, it might sometimes feel as if there is little time to contemplate the question of what makes for a meaningful life. How does a person find deeper meaning for him/herself? What is the purpose of my life? What is the relationship of the meaning of my life to a larger purpose? How do our lives fit into the world around us? The course explores, from many perspectives, some of the responses to the “big questions” of life. Readings and films are taken from different cultures, different time periods, and different spheres of human endeavor and experience.

* FRS 147 Being Human: Rhodri Lewis 

What does it mean to be a human being? How and where to do we locate our identities as human individuals and as members of human communities, cultures, and polities? Should we look within ourselves for answers? To society or nature? Or perhaps to God? This seminar will help you to get a sense of the discussions and controversies prompted by these questions. It will also give you a clear and exhilarating sense of the debates that have defined the human condition. Through readings of Plato, Aristotle, Shakespeare, Hobbes, Rousseau and others, this seminar will enable you to see how human existence has come to be understood

* FRS 151 Time Capsules for Climate Change, to be Opened at Your Reunions: Robert H. Socolow 

This seminar is about thinking about our own future and the future of humanity. What will be important? What will be startling? Climate change will be our vehicle to understand what thinking about the future involves. Much of the analysis will be quantitative. Your essays will be inserted into four time capsules, to be dug up at your 5th, 10th, 25th, and 50th reunions. You will write in depth about new science that clarifies how the Earth works, as well as about specific technologies, their associated policies and how they engage human values. You will also predict your personal futures.

* FRS 183 Piracy in the Early Modern World: Eleanor K. Hubbard 

In this class, we will trace the rise and fall of maritime piracy from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. We will explore the history of real pirates and their roles in empire-building, state-formation, and cultural exchange, as well as the imaginative possibilities that piracy opened up to early modern thinkers: the miniature republics of pirate ships served as an enticing way to imagine other forms of political organization and social relations. We will also explore the strange literary afterlife of early modern piracy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the persistence of piracy and other lawlessness at sea today.

* GEO 102A / ENV 102A / STC 102A and GEO 102B / ENV 102B / STC 102B
Climate: Past, Present, and Future: Daniel M. Sigman 

Which human activities are changing our climate, and does climate change constitute a significant problem? We will investigate these questions through an introduction to climate processes and an exploration of climate from the distant past to today. We will also consider the implications of climate change for the global environment and humans. Intended to be accessible to students not concentrating in science or engineering.

* GEO 361 / ENV 361 / CEE 360 Earth’s Atmosphere: Stephan A. Fueglistaler 

This course discusses the processes that control Earth’s climate – and as such the habitability of Earth – with a focus on the atmosphere and the global hydrological cycle. The course balances overview lectures (also covering topics that have high media coverage like the ‘Ozone hole’ and ‘Global warming’, and the impact of volcanoes on climate) with selected in-depth analyses. The lectures are complemented with homework based on real data, demonstrating basic data analysis techniques employed in climate sciences.

GEO 416 / ENV 418 Microbial Life – A Geobiological View: Xinning Zhang 

Microbes were the first life forms on Earth and are the most abundant life forms today. Their metabolisms underpin the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and other important elements through Earth systems. This course will cover the fundamentals of microbial physiology and ecology and examine how microbial activities have shaped modern and ancient environments, with the goal of illustrating the profound influence of microbial life on our planet for over 3 billion years.

* GEO 425 / MAE 425 Introduction to Ocean Physics for Climate: Gabriel A. Vecchi 

The study of the oceans as a major influence on the atmosphere and the world environment. The contrasts between the properties of the upper and deep oceans; the effects of stratification; the effect of rotation; the wind-driven gyres; the thermohaline circulation.

GEO 561 Earth’s Atmosphere: Stephan A. Fueglistaler 

This course discusses the processes that control Earth’s climate – and as such the habitability of Earth – with a focus on the atmosphere and the global hydrological cycle. The course balances overview lectures (also covering topics that have high media coverage like the “Ozone hole” and “Global warming,” and the impact of volcanoes on climate) with selected in-depth analyses. The lectures are complemented with homework based on real data, demonstrating basic data analysis techniques employed in climate sciences.

* HIS 444 / AMS 444 Commodity Histories: From Sugar to Cocaine: Bernadette J. Perez 

What is a commodity? What does it do? Can it shape history? This course will introduce students to a recently popular genre of historical writing which concentrates on single commodities like cotton, sugar, bananas, and oil. We will consider how commodity histories offer a unique approach to rethinking the boundaries of history. Our readings will cross conceptual and geographic borders, raising questions about the relationship between the global and the local. Course themes will include: environmental change, imperialism/colonialism, capitalism, slavery, race, identity, consumerism, and the relationship between nation-states and corporations.

* HIS 490 The Attention Economy: Historical Perspectives: D. Graham Burnett 

Attention lies at the nexus of perception and action, aesthetics and ethics, wealth and power. Whose eyes (and minds) are where? And for how long? These are central questions driving the evolution of “surveillance capitalism” (not to mention social life itself). New technologies, and new practices, are reshaping our understanding of the attentional subject — with consequences for learning, politics, and collective existence. This course will take up these problems, delving the history of changing ideas about attention in the modern period.

HIS 507 Environmental History: Plural Global and Local Narratives: Emmanuel H. Kreike 

The course assesses the paradigms and models underlying the analysis and description of environmental change and explores alternative ways of understanding environmental change beyond the current linear and homogenizing Nature-to-Culture conceptualizations.

HIS 516 Atlantic Slavery: Wendy Warren 

This graduate level readings seminar introduces students to the historiography of Atlantic slavery, largely but not exclusively focused on the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. Indigenous slavery, imperial slavery, chattel slavery, and other forms of bonded labor are covered. Comparative readings also may introduce alternate trajectories and models of slavery in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

HIS 565  European Social and Cultural History: Yaacob Dweck Yair Mintzker 

A survey of recent scholarship in the social and cultural history of Early Modern Europe, ca. 1400-1800. Includes both classic topics like Renaissance and Reformation, and newer subjects like gender and the transnational.

HOS 594 / HIS 594 History of Medicine – The Cultural Politics of Medicine, Disease and Health: Keith A. Wailoo 

A broad survey of major works and recent trends in the history of medicine, focusing on the cultural politics of disease and epidemics from tuberculosis to AIDS, the relationship of history of medicine to the history of the body and body parts, the politics of public health in comparative national perspective. Surveying key controversies at the intersection of biology and medicine, the intellectual and political logic of specialization in fields such as genetics, health and political activism, and the relationship of class, race, and gender to shifting notions of disease and identity.

* LAS 302 / ENV 312 Environment and Extraction in Latin America: Ryan C. Edwards 

Are Latin American governments extractivist, or the victims of exploitation? This course tackles environmental history by moving through various Latin American landscapes and communities, from the Sonoran Desert and Amazonian Rainforest to Patagonian icefields and Peruvian glaciers. By focusing on a range of natural resources and commodities, from silver and sugar to oil and water, the course uses an historical approach to understand the intersection of economics, social movements, environmentalism, and conceptions of space, place, and nature.

* LAS 307 / ANT 387 Social Justice and the Latin American City: Ben A. Gerlofs 

This course deals with difficult questions of how urban social justice is understood, demanded, pursued and meted out. The UN reports more than 1/2 the world’s population lives in cities, a transformation esp. profound in Lat. America. We will critically assess both this urban terrain and the tools/theories we use to apprehend it, from ‘environmental racism’ to ‘circuits of capital’, and from the ‘Pink Tide’ to the ‘postpolitical’. We will engage distinct approaches to social justice at scales ranging from hyper-local to inescapably-global, and explore justice and its antipodes through case studies of actually existing Lat. American cities.

LAS 376 / ECO 376 The Economic Analysis of Conflict: Ana María lbáñez 

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the microeconomic analysis of internal conflict. Students will study how conflict imposes economic costs on the population. We will study how we can apply economic theory and rigorous empirical methods to the microeconomic analysis of internal conflict. The class will cover three broad topics: (i) the proximate causes (or correlates) of war; (ii) the economic legacies of conflict; and (iii) forced migration.

* MOL 380 Modern Microbiology: Martin C. Jonikas 

Microbes offer a rich world for exploration, a teeming universe invisible to the naked eye but thrilling in terms of diversity and scope. Human beings could not survive in their absence, yet we often think of them as the enemy. In fact, the majority are beneficial and can be harnessed for good in science and industry. This course will examine both sides: first an overview of microbial growth and function as well as specialized applications in areas such as photosynthesis, synthetic biology, quorum sensing, and CRISPR, with subsequent study of the threats to human health arising from dangerous pathogens that cause bacterial and viral disease.

* PHI 202 / CHV 202 Introduction to Moral Philosophy: Sarah E. McGrath 

This course will be an examination of some central topics in moral philosophy. We will consider questions such as: Is abortion morally permissible? Is there a moral difference between killing someone and letting someone die? How is it permissible to treat animals? We will also consider more general moral questions, such as what makes an action right or wrong & to what extent is this a matter of the action’s consequences? When is an agent morally responsible for her actions? Is there a single true morality, or is moral truth relative to cultures or individuals?

PHI 380 / CHV 380 Explaining Values: Victoria McGeer 

This course will examine the way in which evaluations permeate our understanding of human action, agency, and responsibility, and what exactly such evaluations amount to. We will approach these issues primarily from a philosophical perspective, but where appropriate this will be augmented by scientific and social scientific perspectives. Topics to be covered include self-control, addiction, weakness of the will, and obedience to authority.

* POL 313 / CHV 313 Global Justice: Charles R. Beitz 

What, if any, norms of justice apply to the institutions and practice of world politics? Topics may include “political realism” and skepticism about global morality; just wars and justice in warfare; ethics of humanitarian intervention; the nature and basis of human rights; world poverty and global distributive justice; climate change; democracy and accountability in global institutions. Readings chosen from recent works in political philosophy.

POL 547 Identity Politics: Omar Wasow 

Is human psychology ‘groupish’? How do government institutions like schools, police and elections influence the salience of various ethnic and religious boundaries? This course investigates the relationship between identity, groups and politics in the U.S. and in comparative context. We consider general theories of group identity development; assess empirical approaches to the study of racial and ethnic groups in politics; intersections of salient identities and look at how politically relevant aspects of identity can be measured for conducting original research.

* PSY 402 Attitudes and Persuasion: Joel Cooper 

Attitudes matter. Throughout the history of the world, people have taken extraordinary steps to support a set of attitudes and beliefs that helped to bring about a better world. Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King led societies to new views of human dignity by their written words and their behaviors. Every day, people advocate for their ideals. They persuade and organize in the service of bringing about a world that is closer to the paragon in which they believe.

* STC 349 / ENV 349 Writing about Science: Michael D. Lemonick 

This course will teach STEM & non-STEM majors how to write about research in STEM fields with clarity and a bit of flair. Goal will be to learn to convey technical topics to non-experts in a compelling, enjoyable way while staying true to the underlying facts, context and concepts. We’ll do this through readings, class discussion, encounters with professional writers and journalists of all sorts, across several different media. Most important of all, students will practice what they learn in frequent writing assignments that will be critiqued extensively by an experienced science journalist.

* URB 385 / SOC 385 / HUM 385 / ARC 385 Mapping Gentrification: Staff

This seminar introduces the study of gentrification, with a focus on mapping projects using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) software. Readings, films, and site visits will situate the topic, as the course examines how racial landscapes of gentrification, culture and politics have been influenced by and helped drive urban change. Tutorials in ArcGIS will allow students to convert observations of urban life into fresh data and work with existing datasets. Learn to read maps critically, undertake multifaceted spatial analysis, and master new cartographic practices associated with emerging scholarship in the Digital and Urban Humanities.

* WWS 306 / ECO 329 / ENV 319 Environmental Economics: Smita B. Brunnermeier 

Course introduces use of economics in understanding both the sources of and the remedies to environmental and resource allocation problems. It emphasizes the reoccurrence of economic phenomena like public goods, externalities, market failure and imperfect information. Students learn about the design and evaluation of environmental policy instruments, the political economy of environmental policy, and the valuation of environmental and natural resource services. The concepts are illustrated in a variety of applications from domestic pollution of air, water and land to international issues such as global warming and sustainable development.

WWS 307 / ECO 349 Public Economics: Elizabeth C. Bogan 

The role of government in promoting efficiency and equity in the U.S. economy. Conditions when markets fail to be efficient. Problems with government allocation of resources. Economic analysis and public policies regarding health care, education, poverty, the environment, financial regulations and other important issues.

* WWS 370 / POL 308 / CHV 301 Ethics and Public Policy: Steven A. Kelts 

The course examines major moral controversies in public life and differing conceptions of justice, the common good, and civic virtues. It seeks to help students think and write about the ethical considerations that ought to shape public institutions and guide public authorities. The course will focus on issues that are particularly challenging for advanced, pluralist democracies. These issues may include the status of cultures and nations, justice in war, markets and distributive justice, the virtues of citizens in a capitalist society, property rights, women’s rights in developing countries, education policy, and cross-border migration.

WWS 385 / AMS 350 Civil Society and Public Policy: Stanley N. Katz 

Civil society is the arena of voluntary organizations (churches, social welfare organizations, sporting clubs) and communal activity. Scholars now tell us that such voluntary and cooperative activities create “social capital” — a stock of mutual trust that forms the glue that holds society together. The course will be devoted to the study of the history of these concepts, and to the analysis of their application to the United States and other societies. This will be an interdisciplinary effort, embracing history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, and other disciplines.

WWS 387 / AMS 387 Education Policy in the United States: Jennifer L. Jennings 

Poor students concentrated in urban centers lag academically behind their more advantaged peers, and explanations for this achievement gap are hotly debated. While some have pointed to the quality of education offered in urban public schools as the primary culprit, others have drawn attention to the role of out-of-school factors in creating and exacerbating these gaps. In this course, we will evaluate the possibilities for and barriers to closing achievement gaps. We will think systematically about the effects of school reform on schools, teachers, and the students they serve.

WWS 501 The Politics of Public Policy: Lisa Anderson Scott M. Guenther 
Andrew Moravcsik Jonathan F. Mummolo 

An analysis of the forces that shape the behavior of public organizations and individuals in organizational settings. The emphasis is on the workings of U.S. governmental agencies. Special attention is given to writing skills as they apply to the roles of advisers and decision makers in public-sector organizations.

WWS 521 Domestic Politics: Markus Prior 

An introduction to the political analysis of policy making in the American setting. The course includes theoretical and empirical analyses of political institutions, including executives, legislatures, and bureaucracies. It also examines the political environment in which these institutions operate, with special attention given to the role of public opinion, interest groups, and elections.

WWS 528F Domestic Policy Analysis – Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation: Benjamin T. Jealous Brian Trelstad 

Over the last 20 years, the emerging field of social entrepreneurship has taken new approaches to problems in education, waste management and global public health. This course focuses on types and stages of different social enterprises (non-profits/hybrid organizations/for-profits), evaluates nature of capital available from grants to patient capital to market-return investments. Course seeks to equip students with a framework for understanding how: 1) social enterprise can complement traditional provision of public services and 2) new markets are being created that deliver clear social benefits while generating returns to investors.

WWS 537 / SOC 537 Social Organization of Cities: Douglas S. Massey 

A review of the historical emergence and social evolution of cities and urban life. Course presents current theories regarding the ecological and social structure of urban areas, and how urban social organization affects the behavior and well-being of human beings who live and work in cities.

WWS 543 International Trade Policy: Stephen J. Redding 

Evaluates arguments for and against protection and adjustment assistance and considers topics chosen from the following: non-tariff barriers, dumping, embargo threats and trade warfare, and the political economy of trade policy formation. Special attention is given to trade problems of the less-developed countries, including North-South trade relations and commodity price stabilization. Prerequisite: 511c.

WWS 564 / POP 564 Poverty, Inequality and Health in the World: Anne C. Case 

About well-being throughout the world, with focus on income and health. Explores what happened to poverty, inequality, and health, in the US, and internationally. Discusses conceptual foundations of national and global measures of inequality, poverty, and health; construction of measures, and extent to which they can be trusted; relationship between globalization, poverty, and health, historically and currently. Examines links between health and income, why poor people are less healthy and live less long than rich people.

WWS 581C Topics in Economics – Energy Economics: Amy B. Craft 

Examines the economics behind many issues related to energy use, including the investment and use of renewable and non-renewable resources, energy conservation, deregulation of energy markets, transportation, and energy independence. Current policy options will be discussed.

WWS 590A / ECO 581L Economic Perspectives on Inequality (Half-Term): Marc Fleurbaey 

Economics is centrally concerned with models of human capital development, educational attainment, labor market dynamics, unemployment, labor turnover, job duration, wage setting institutions, the role of unions, human capital formation, the relationship between economic status and other aspects of well-being (including health). Economists are essential partners in the behavioral study of preferences and decision making, mobility and redistribution, and the institutions of industrial relations that govern the labor market.

WWS 594R Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term) – Behavioral Science in Environmental Policy: Elke U. Weber 

Even though numerous influential reports call for earlier and better integration of behavioral science theory and insights into the policy process, the reality is that disciplines other than economics and the law have had little or no influence on the design or implementation of environmental or technology policy. We review reasons and consequences for this failure and examine paths towards better future integration.

 

 

 

 

SPRING 2018

 

Updated for Fall 2017-18

AMS 306 / GHP 411 (SA)   na, npdf
Issues in American Public Health

Leslie E. Gerwin 

The study of public health is an interdisciplinary inquiry involving issues of politics, policy, history, science, law, philosophy, ethics, geography, sociology, environmental studies, and economics, among others. Students will examine the government’s role in assuring and promoting health, through the exploration of issues on America’s “public health agenda,” such as epidemic response, tobacco use, the impact of weight on health, mandatory vaccination, disease prevention, and violence. In doing so, they will consider the impact of race, income, gender, place and environment, education, capitalism and democracy on health outcomes.

AMS 353 / HIS 445 / LAS 359 (HA)   na, npdf

Sugar: A Commodity History of the United States

Bernadette J. Perez 

Moving from the colonial era to the present, and from the Caribbean to the Midwest and the Pacific, we will place sugar in the history of European colonialism, trans-Atlantic slavery, capitalism, American Empire, and global immigration restrictions. During this period, the United States built a sugar empire that relied upon differentially racialized laborers, who worked under a variety of coercive labor systems. We will explore how the production and consumption of sugar connected diverse people and places in unequal ways, focusing on themes such as labor, migration, race, gender, citizenship, identity, power, resistance, and the land.

 

AMS 364 / ENV 365 (EM)   na, npdf

Environmental and Social Crisis

Laurel Mei-Singh 

In recent years, public discourse has stressed the urgency of impending environmental crisis. With the premise that “there’s no such thing as a natural disaster,” we will explore the social and political elements of environmental crisis. Our baseline definition of crisis will be: a moment when an existing set of relations is markedly upset. We will look at how war and capitalism precipitate environmental crises and how state and corporate institutions also benefit from these disasters. Our studies will begin with apocalyptic texts–which are reflections and exaggerations of existing realities–alongside environmental justice scholarship.

* ANT 300A (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Ethnography, Evidence and Experience

Rena S. Lederman 

This course connects ethnographic theory (e.g., about culture, relationality, context, and interpretation) to everyday experience and vice versa. Readings from academic and media sources align with weekly journal writing to cultivate students’ ethnographic awareness of their own and others’ embodied knowledge and the ethics, politics, and ritual dimensions of relationships, language, and more. Throughout we scrutinize how “experience” becomes ethnographic “evidence” and how the immediacies of participant-observation fieldwork bear on wide-angle questions about power/value hierarchies, historical and cultural context, and societal dynamics.

 

ARC 401 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Theories of Housing and Urbanism

Andrew Laing 

The seminar will explore theories of urbanism and housing by reading canonical writers who have created distinctive and influential ideas about urbanism and housing from the nineteenth century to the present. The writers are architects, planners, and social scientists. The theories are interdisciplinary. One or two major works will be discussed each week. We will critically evaluate their relevance and significance for architecture now. Topics include: modernism, technological futurism, density, the new urbanism, the networked city, landscape urbanism, and sustainable urbanism.

ARC 519   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Climate Change, Adaptation and Urban Design

Guy J.P. Nordenson 

Climate change adaptation is a pressing and difficult challenge to urban design, ecological and engineering planning theory and practice. It is clear that architects, planners, engineers and designers have an important role to help cities contend with climate adaptation. This seminar reviews the general state of science and practice of climate change and adaptation with a primary focus on the United States. It looks to the work of Frederick Law Olmsted for some of the theoretical basis of developing an approach to climate adaptation that is democratic and progressive and evaluate the impediments which restrict change.

 

ARC 545   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

The Philosophy of Urban History

Manuel J. DeLanda 

The class introduces students to the branch of the philosophy of history that specializes in cities. Cities are social entities that exist at an intermediate scale between the micro-level of individuals and the macro-level of society as a whole. Social science has tended to focus at those two extremes, while the intermediate meso-level has been neglected. The philosophy of urban history aims at remedying this situation, stressing not only the role of cities as historical actors, but also the role of other meso-level social entities from local communities and institutional organizations to urban regions and provinces.

 

* CEE 207 / ENV 207 (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Introduction to Environmental Engineering

Ian C. Bourg 

The course introduces the basic chemical and physical processes of relevance in environmental engineering. Mass and energy balance and transport concepts are introduced and the chemical principles governing reaction kinetics and phase partitioning are presented. We then turn our focus to the applications in environmental engineering problems related to water and air pollution.

CEE 334 / WWS 452 / ENV 334 / ENE 334 (STN)   na, npdf

Global Environmental Issues

Denise L. Mauzerall 

This course examines a set of global environmental issues including population growth, ozone layer depletion, climate change, air pollution, the environmental consequences of energy supply and demand decisions and sustainable development. It provides an overview of the scientific basis for these problems and examines past, present and possible future policy responses. Individual projects, presentations, and problem sets are included.

 

CEE 477 / ENE 477 (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Engineering Design for Sustainable Development

Stephen Song 

Students will design several features of a LEED-certified building project. Features that will be considered include ground source heat pumps; ventilation; photovoltaics (PV); insulation; glazing; green materials; and storm water management systems, including a green roof, and rainwater harvesting. Ventilation will be designed considering the potential for vapor emissions from building materials. Energy software will be used to determine the carbon footprint and energy costs of alternative designs.

CEE 581   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Theory of Groundwater Flow

Michael A. Celia 

Fundamental physics of fluid flow and contaminant transport in porous media; derivation of governing equations; analytical solutions for simplified equations, with applications to well hydraulics, contaminant transport, and parameter estimation; and development of simple numerical methods with applications to field problems. The course also covers flow and transport in unsaturated soils and provides an introduction to multiphase flow systems.

 

* CHV 310 / PHI 385 (EM)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Practical Ethics

Peter A. Singer 

Should we be trying to live our lives so as to do the most good, and if so, what would that involve? Does a human embryo have a greater claim to protection than a chimpanzee? Should we be able to choose to end our own life, if we are terminally ill? Are we ethically required to limit our greenhouse gas emissions? What is an ethical diet? Are we justified in eating animals? Why should we act ethically, anyway? You will be encouraged to question your own ethical beliefs on these and other issues, and to explore the extent to which reason and argument can play a role in everyday ethical decision-making.

* COM 211 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Reading and Writing Food from Homer to Julia Child

Leonard Barkan 

This course explores a crucial aspect of Comparative Culture: the literature surrounding food, ranging from Homer to Julia Child. We will begin with a brief history of eating and drinking, mostly as they appear in literary texts from antiquity and early modernity. Topics will include Adam and Eve’s apple, the Last Supper, and Proust’s Madeleine. We will then proceed to food writing from modern times, focusing on taste, on the lure of particular foods, and on the social circumstances of dining. Particular emphasis on the reading and writing of culinary autobiography.

* DAN 312 / AMS 398 / GSS 346 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

FAT: The F-Word and the Public Body

Judith Hamera 

This seminar investigates discourses and politics around the fat body from a performance studies perspective. How does this “f-word” discipline and regulate bodies in /as public? How do dancers reveal these politics with special clarity? How might fat be a liberating counterperformance? We will examine the changing history, aesthetics, politics, and meanings of fatness using dance, performance, and media texts as key case studies. Intersectional dimensions of the fat body are central to the course. Emphasis primarily on the US. Assignments include written work and group performances. No dance experience necessary.

ECO 321 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Industrial Organization

Nicholas W. Buchholz 

This course studies firms, markets and competition. We will study the theory of industrial organization, focusing on analyzing the way firms make decisions, as well as the impact of those decisions on market outcomes such as market prices, quantities, the type of products offered and social welfare. The goals of the course include the development of intuition for firm strategic behavior, such as pricing, as well as the development of skills for the analysis of formal models.

 

ECO 372 / EPS 342 (SA)   No Audit

Economics of Europe

Silvia Weyerbrock 

Europe is at a crossroads. Political and economic integration in the European Union (EU) exceeds levels reached in the rest of the world. Economic integration not only affects trade but also migration, agriculture, competition, regions, energy, and money. Most euro area economies have been struggling with interlocking crises involving debt, banking and growth. The EU is facing a migration crisis. The UK voted for Brexit, and other countries may follow. This course studies economic integration and the ongoing crises. It uses economic analysis to study policy issues.

 

* ECO 382 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Urban Economics

Andrés Maggi 

Cities play a central role in the economy. But why do they exist? Why do people and firms pay so much money in order to crowd closely together? What forces shape their structure, size, and long-run success? The goal of this course is to answer some of these questions by analyzing cities as economic systems using both theoretical and empirical tools. The theory side of the course covers a standard set of urban models describing both the structure of cities and how they interact as part of larger national economies. The empirical side of the course draws on recent academic papers to introduce some of the econometric tools used to study cities.

 

ECO 520 / POL 577   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Economics and Politics

Wolfgang Pesendorfer 

Focused on analytical models of political institutions, this course is organized around canonical models and their applications. These include: voting models, menu auctions, models of reputation and cheap talk games. These models are used to explain patterns of participation in elections, institutions of congress, lobbying, payments to special interest groups and other observed phenomena.

 

ECO 565   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Health Economics I

Janet M. Currie 
Tom S. Vogl 

Examines health issues in both developed and developing countries. Specific topics include the evolution of health over the life course; the fetal origins hypothesis; the two-way links between socioeconomic status and health; the impact of social safety nets on health outcomes; environmental threats to children’s health and development; health insurance and its effects on health; the industrial organization of health care delivery; and the relationship between health and economic growth.

 

* EEB 211 / MOL 211 (STL)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Life on Earth: Chaos and Clockwork of Biological Design

Joshua Akey 
Andrew P. Dobson 
Daniel I. Rubenstein 
Katherine M. Sullivan 

An examination of how life evolved and how organisms function. Design–‘intelligent’ and otherwise–will provide a unifying theme. Why do some microbes produce slime and others do not? Why are males brightly colored in some species, but in others females are the showy sex? Why do humans have knees that fail whereas horses and zebras do not? These and other ‘why is it so’ questions related to the origin and history of life, genetic code, biochemistry, physiology, morphology and body plans, sex and reproduction, cooperation, and ecosystems will be explored. This course is required of all EEB majors and fulfills a requirement for medical school.

 

EEB 308 (STN)   No Pass/D/Fail

Conservation Biology

David S. Wilcove 

Students will learn to identify, understand, and (perhaps) reconcile conflicts between human activities such as farming, forestry, industry, and infrastructure development, and the conservation of species and natural ecosystems. We will also explore the role of biodiversity in providing critical ecosystem services to people. We will examine these topics in an interdisciplinary way, with a primary focus on ecology, but also including consideration of the economic and social factors underlying threats to biodiversity. In fall 2017, the course will include a mandatory field trip to Florida for the duration of fall break.

 

* EEB 309   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Evolutionary Biology

Bridgett M. vonHoldt 

All life on Earth has, and continues to, evolve. This course will explore evolution within two frameworks: conservation genetics and species interactions. In the first half of the course, we will explore fundamental processes that work together to shape biodiversity and viability, both at the organismal and molecular levels. We then will examine how species interactions can be the driver of change, from sexual selection to predation and pathogens. Overall, this course will provide you with the basic tools to understand how evolution continues to shape contemporary ecological and the phenotypic traits we observe on our planet.

 

* EEB 313   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Behavioral Ecology

Christina P. Riehl 

How does a swarm of honeybees collectively decide on a new site for their hive? When a mother mouse protects her young, are her behaviors genetically determined? Why do ravens share food with each other? This course is an introduction to behavioral ecology, which asks why animals act the way they do, how their behaviors have been shaped by natural selection, and how these behaviors influence their surroundings. We will first discuss behaviors at the individual level, then move to reproductive behaviors. The final section of the course will focus on social evolution, the origins of cooperation, and human behavioral ecology.

 

* EEB 321 (STL)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Ecology: Species Interactions, Biodiversity and Society

Robert M. Pringle 

How do wild organisms interact with each other, their physical environments, and human societies? Lectures will examine a series of fundamental topics in ecology–herbivory, predation, competition, mutualism, species invasions, biogeographic patterns, extinction, climate change, and conservation, among others–through the lens of case studies drawn from all over the world. Readings will provide background information necessary to contextualize these case studies and clarify the linkages between them. Laboratories and fieldwork will explore the process of translating observations and data into an understanding of how the natural world works.

 

* EEB 327 / MOL 327 / GHP 327 (STN)   na, npdf

Immune Systems: From Molecules to Populations

Andrea L. Graham 

How do immune systems work, and why do they work as they do? Why is there so much immunological polymorphism in animal populations? To address these questions, students will examine immunology across multiple biological scales. At the molecular and cellular scales, students will learn mechanisms by which animals recognize and kill parasites. At the population scale, students will investigate causes of the tremendous immunological heterogeneity exhibited by animals. Both the clinical relevance and the evolutionary basis of polymorphisms will be emphasized.

 

* EEB 329   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Sensory Ecology

Mary C. Stoddard 

Sensory ecology investigates how animals extract information from the physical and social environment. All animals acquire and use information, but the sensory systems involved vary dramatically. Bats echolocate. Birds see ultraviolet colors. Electric eels shock their prey. Spiders communicate chemically. How do these processes work, and why did they evolve? In this course, we explore the mechanisms and functions of animal communication. We first review the different senses, emphasizing physiology and neurobiology. We then examine how animals use sensory information in foraging, mate choice, cooperation, anti-predator defense and mimicry.

 

EEB 502   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Fundamental Concepts in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior I

Peter Andolfatto 
Julien F. Ayroles 
Andrea L. Graham 
Lindy McBride 
C. Jessica E. Metcalf 
Stephen W. Pacala 
Christina P. Riehl 
Corina E. Tarnita 
David S. Wilcove 

Advanced discussions of ecology, evolution, and behavior focus on 50 fundamental papers. Ecological topics include dynamics and structure of populations, communities, ecosystems, and conservation biology. Behavioral topics include instinct and learning, social behavior, physiological ecology, and the evolution of behavior. Evolutionary topics include speciation, evolutionary and quantitative genetics, molecular evolution, evolutionary stable strategies, and evolution of development. (These are core courses)

 

ELE 381 / COS 381   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Networks: Friends, Money and Bytes

Christopher G. Brinton 

This course is oriented around 20 practical questions in the social, economic, and technological networks in our daily lives. How does Google sell ad spaces and rank webpages? How does Netflix recommend movies and Amazon rank products? How do I influence people on Facebook and Twitter? Why doesn’t the Internet collapse under congestion, and does it have an Achilles heel? Why does each gigabyte of mobile data cost $10, but Skype is free? How come WiFi is slower at hotspots than at home, and what is inside the cloud of iCloud? In formulating and addressing these questions, we introduce the fundamental concepts behind the networking industry.

 

ENE 418 / CBE 418 (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Fundamentals of Biofuels

José L. Avalos 

What are biofuels, and why are we making them? What are 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation biofuels? What is the controversy surrounding the food versus fuel debate? Will thermocatalysis or genetic engineering improve biofuel production? Can we make biofuels directly from light or electricity? These are some of the questions we will answer through engaging discussions, primary literature readings, and hands-on experience in making biofuels. In precept we will make bioethanol from corn (beer) or molasses (wine), biodiesel from cooking oil, and oil from algae. Grades are based on participation, an oral presentation, and three short lab reports.

 

ENV 304 / ECO 328 / EEB 304 / WWS 455 (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Disease Ecology, Economics, and Policy

Bryan T. Grenfell 

The dynamics of the emergence and spread of disease arise from a complex interplay between disease ecology, economics, and human behavior. Lectures will provide an introduction to complementarities between economic and epidemiological approaches to understanding the emergence, spread, and control of infectious diseases. The course will cover topics such as drug-resistance in bacterial and parasitic infections, individual incentives to vaccinate, the role of information in the transmission of infectious diseases, and the evolution of social norms in healthcare practices.

 

ENV 305   No Audit

Topics in Environmental Studies – Building American Style: Land-Use Policies and Rules

Deborah E. Popper 
Frank J. Popper 

Americans have built and preserved an astounding variety of environments. The course examines the evolving complex of incentives and regulations that drove the choices of where and how places developed. It focuses on the emergence of land-use and environmental planning as a way to encourage or discourage growth and to mitigate or intensify its environmental, social, and economic effects.We will examine the latest tools for building and protecting the American landscape. Case studies include Southern California, New Haven, the American Great Plains, and others. Analysis will be from historical, policy-oriented, and predictive perspectives.

 

* ENV 323 / ENG 315 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

The Nature of the City

Ashley J. Dawson 

This interdisciplinary seminar examines the production of urban nature. Nature and the city are usually seen as separate, even antithetical, yet cities are now responsible for the majority of carbon emissions that cause climate change. Generating a creative politics of nature in and for the city is consequently a key component of contemporary environmentalism. Reading across fields such as architecture, geography, and postcolonial studies, we will explore the material and social infrastructures through which nature is metabolized in cities, as well as the representations (fictional and otherwise) through which urban nature is depicted.

 

ENV 327 (EM)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Investigating an Ethos of Sustainability at Princeton

Shana S. Weber 

Achieving sustained human and environmental health is a global priority given increasingly disruptive economic, social and environmental conditions. Evidence suggests that humanity is capable of producing sustainable technological and social solutions, but must do so between now and mid-century. This course explores social/ethical dimensions of the sustainability challenge through an evaluation of related ethics and psychology of social norms literature, and includes an exercise in proposing evidence-based solutions toward cultivating an ethos of sustainability on the Princeton campus as a demonstration-scale system.

 

* ENV 369 / ENG 383 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Environmental Imaginings and Global Change

Robert Nixon 

This course in the environmental arts and humanities will explore the vital transformative role that narrative and image can play in shifting our imaginative, ethical, and political horizons. Students will have the chance to engage with cutting edge creativity by environmental filmmakers, writers, sculptors and digital artists. Our perspective will be international and interdisciplinary as we consider experimental strategies to change the force fields of environmental perception and thereby impact the emotional life of the body politic. For, as novelist Ruth Ozeki puts it, “The very act of storytelling is itself a form of hope.”

 

ENV 407 / AFS 407 / GHP 427 (SA)   na, npdf

Africa’s Food and Conservation Challenge

Timothy D. Searchinger 

This course will explore the economic, environmental, and social challenges of meeting growing food needs in sub-Saharan Africa. The region today has the lowest crop yields, the highest percentage of hungry people, and the highest population growth rates, and relies heavily on firewood for energy. The region also has vast areas of environmentally valuable forests and savannas. It has technical opportunities to produce food better but faces challenges from high rainfall variability and climate change.

 

FRE 379 (LA)   No Pass/D/Fail

The Art of Insignificance

André Benhaïm 

Perhaps the greatness of works of art and literature — and of one’s life — can be gauged by the importance they confer to things of no obvious significance: anecdotes, anonymous people, ephemeral characters, trivial details gleaned from daily life. Through readings of texts and film, as well as artworks from Princeton University Art Museum’s collections, we will question, far beyond the concerns of minimalism, what is at stake in the possibility of the sublime within the banal. At the crossings of ethics and aesthetics, be raised the questions of what it means to not mean much, and, yet, be absolutely indispensable.

 

FRS 129 Poverty Policies and the Dispossessed in America SA
Carol Stack

Urban disasters like the flooding of New Orleans in 2005 provide a particular lens on social inequality and the danger zone normally concealed in the mundane practices of democracy. In this seminar we ask what can we learn about the precarious arrangement of class and race inequality in America by turning to the ruptured social order created by Hurricane Katrina. Drawing from ethnographic accounts, print media, and popular culture, we will examine the findings that turned Katrina into a national debate.

During the first three weeks of the seminar, we will turn to the historical controversies over the “culture of poverty,” debates that are deeply seeded in urban sociology and anthropology. Together we will identify key controversies in the Moynihan Report and then reframe the discussion in light of the contributions of William Julius Wilson and Susan Greenbaum, two scholars whose work has framed the social policy debates over the causes of persistent poverty.

By week four, we begin to dig more deeply into the ethnographic data on the strength or fragility of low-income kin networks by looking cross-culturally at a comparison of African American kin ties and Mexican Immigrant kin networks.

By mid-semester, we will turn to the untidy chaos of disasters and the impact of recovery policies on low-income families. Katherine Browne’s award winning Standing in the Need, and Alice Fothergill and Lori Peek’s The Children of Katrina, both document the efforts of African American families to get control over their lives in the eye of the storm, and their anguish in the years that follow. The final book for the seminar, Is This America, by Ron Eyerman, brings the readings back full circle to the public debate on social policies of disaster. Eyerman draws from print media, television, and the national debate on poverty, and links poverty and disaster policy together in the context of Katrina.     

 

FRS 147 Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making STN
Yael Niv
The Stansky Family Freshman Seminar

You are at the college dining hall, faced with lots of options but holding only a small(ish) plate. How do you choose? In this seminar, we will discuss how trial-and-error learning gives rise to the everyday behavior of mice (well, more often in the lab, rats) and people. We will take a modern, integrative approach to phenomena that grew from classic animal-learning paradigms such as classical conditioning and instrumental conditioning, examining them through the lens of computational models of learning and decision making and current neuroscientific knowledge. We will answer questions such as: Why do we have such a hard time walking away from rewards (and how is this exploited by fortune tellers? How best can we train a dog to do new tricks (and how does this apply to bringing up children? Why do we sometimes find ourselves performing an action out of habit, even though we have no desire for its outcome (e.g., opening the fridge as we walk into the kitchen, even though we are not hungry)? Why do we press the “walk” button at an intersection more times when we are in a hurry (surely once is enough)? How do learning processes go awry in addiction?

For each topic, we will discuss behavioral and psychological findings, computational algorithms that underlie this behavior, and the neural hardware (and software) that implements the algorithms in the brain.

 

* FRS 153 (HA)   na, npdf

Epidemics in World History

Adrian Lopez-Deni

Barrett Family Freshman Seminars

How have long-distance connections that have accompanied the development of capitalism contributed to the spread of infectious disease? How has pathological globalization contributed to the appeal of isolationism as a political response to the rise of capital? How can we revisit old debates about the role of agency and structure, using pandemics as case studies? This course will use a series of catastrophic encounters between humans and pathogens as starting points for the study of the development of global capitalism since the 14th century. We will also discuss the problematic relationship between cosmopolitanism and imperialism as illustrated by the tense relationship between the epidemiology of disease spread and the geopolitics of disease control. Special attention will be paid to six major topics, chronologically arranged: (1) the role of commerce in the spread of disease throughout the Old World; (2) the impact of differential immunities in European expansion; (3) the epidemiological consequences of industrialization and revolution; (4) the parallel rise of bacteriology and modern imperialism; (5) the medical side of 20th-century warfare; and (6) the globalization of disease in the age of AIDS and SARS.

 

* FRS 165 (SA)   na, npdf

Is Your Zip Code Your Destiny? Exploring the Social Determinants of Health

Heather H. Howard 

Over the last century, the United States has made substantial health improvements, including increased life expectancy. Yet, despite that progress, and even though we spend approximately one-sixth of our gross domestic product on health care (more than any other industrialized nation), we have significant, and persistent, health care disparities and gaps in health access and outcomes. We are beginning to understand that there is more to individual and community health than habits, health care, or even our genes. Indeed, the context of our lives — where we live, work, and play — helps determines our health status. This course will explore the social determinants of health, including economic opportunity (or lack thereof), environmental influences, educational resources, social capital, and public safety.

This course will examine the factors affecting health status from the unique perspective of Trenton. New Jersey’s capital, Trenton is a diverse city with approximately 84,000 residents, has low home ownership rates and one of the state’s highest rates of violent crime, and one-third of its children live in poverty while nearly one-half are obese. In the face of these challenges, the Trenton Health Team — a community health improvement collaborative — is working to improve health outcomes and contain health care costs in Trenton. We will partner with them to learn about the challenges in improving health status.

The proposed partnership will allow students to explore the complex factors affecting the health of a community and the roles of community-based organizations, the government, and health care providers in addressing health inequities and improving health status. A series of readings will expose students to the current academic literature, and students will be exposed to the work of the Trenton Health Team through visits to the city and meetings with community leaders and service providers. Seminar participants will work on group projects that will inform the work of the Trenton Health Team, and each student will do independent research on a topic of their choosing for their final paper.

 

* FRS 183 (HA)   na, npdf

Piracy in the Early Modern World

Eleanor K. Hubbard 

In the early modern period, from roughly 1500 to 1800, thousands of sailing ships crisscrossed the world’s seas and oceans, carrying goods and people whose movement was essential to the great transformations of the time: New World silver, enslaved Africans, Brazilian sugar, Virginian tobacco, spices and textiles from Southeast Asia, and so on. But why bother trading merchandise when you could simply seize it? Pirates — and their semi-legal fellows, corsairs and privateers — lurked around the richest trade routes, waiting to fall on merchant ships, in a period of violently competitive trade. Some were simply out for whatever they could get, but others were acting in the interests of particular states. The history of piracy, then, is not simply the history of violent outlaws, but also of the underbelly of the growth of maritime trade and the rough edges of European international politics and imperial expansion.

In this seminar, we will trace the rise and fall of piracy from the 16th to the 18th centuries, ranging from the Mediterranean to the Caribbean to the Indian Ocean. Piracy serves as a useful lens for investigating cultural contact and exchange outside of “official” channels. Pirate crews and their victims were polyglot and religiously and ethnically diverse. Conflict about the boundaries between privateering and piracy will allow us to track the development of state power and international law. Pirates were also important for political imagination: the miniature republics of pirate ships served as an enticing way for early modern writers to imagine other forms of political organization, and accounts of female pirates offered opportunities to explore gender relations.

 

* GEO 203 / ENE 203 (QR)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Fundamentals of Solid Earth Science

Jessica C. Irving 

A quantitative introduction to Solid Earth system science, focusing on the underlying physical and chemical processes and their geological and geophysical expression. Through the course we investigate the Earth starting from its basic constituents and continue though its accretion, differentiation and evolution and discuss how these processes create and sustain habitable conditions on Earth’s surface. Topics include nucleosynthesis, planetary thermodynamics, plate tectonics, seismology, geomagnetism, petrology, sedimentology and the global carbon cycle. Two field trips included.

 

* GEO 361 / ENV 361 / CEE 360 (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Earth’s Atmosphere

Stephan A. Fueglistaler 

This course discusses the processes that control Earth’s climate – and as such the habitability of Earth – with a focus on the atmosphere and the global hydrological cycle. The course balances overview lectures (also covering topics that have high media coverage like the ‘Ozone hole’ and ‘Global warming’, and the impact of volcanoes on climate) with selected in-depth analyses. The lectures are complemented with homework based on real data, demonstrating basic data analysis techniques employed in climate sciences.

 

* GEO 363 / CHM 331 / ENV 331 (STN)   No Pass/D/Fail

Environmental Geochemistry: Chemistry of the Natural Systems

Satish C. Myneni 

Covers topics including origin of elements; formation of the Earth; evolution of the atmosphere and oceans; atomic theory and chemical bonding; crystal chemistry and ionic substitution in crystals; reaction equilibria and kinetics in aqueous and biological systems; chemistry of high-temperature melts and crystallization process; and chemistry of the atmosphere, soil, marine and riverine environments. The biogeochemistry of contaminants and their influence on the environment will also be discussed.

 

GEO 365 (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Evolution and Catastrophes

Gerta Keller 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

This course introduces students to the evolution of life and mass extinctions based on a broad survey of major events in Earth history as revealed by the fossil record. Concepts and techniques of paleontology are applied to all aspects, including colonization of the oceans, invasion of land, mass extinction’s and evolutionary radiation’s. The roles of major catastrophes in the history of life are evaluated, including meteorite impacts, volcanism, climate change, and oceanic anoxia.

 

GEO 418 / CHM 418   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Environmental Aqueous Geochemistry

Anne M. Morel-Kraepiel 

Application of quantitative chemical principles to the study of natural waters. Includes equilibrium computations, carbonate system, gas exchange, precipitation/dissolution of minerals, coordination of trace metals, redox reactions in water and sediments.

 

* GEO 425 / MAE 425   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Introduction to Ocean Physics for Climate

Gabriel A. Vecchi 

The study of the oceans as a major influence on the atmosphere and the world environment. The contrasts between the properties of the upper and deep oceans; the effects of stratification; the effect of rotation; the wind-driven gyres; the thermohaline circulation.

 

GEO 427 / CEE 427 / ENV 427   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Fundamentals of the Earth’s Climate System

Thomas L. Delworth 
Stephan A. Fueglistaler 

The goal of the course is to provide students with an introductory overview of the broad factors that determine our current climate, as well as past and future climates. We first build a foundation for understanding the principal features of today’s climate. This includes examining the Earth’s energy and water cycles, the processes determining the principal atmospheric and ocean circulation features, climate feedback processes, and dominant modes of variability. We then use this framework to interpret observational records of past climates, including ice age cycles, and to examine projections of future climate change.

 

GEO 534   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Geological Constraints on the Global Carbon Cycle

John A. Higgins 

This course explores global geochemical cycles through the use of simple numerical models. Topics covered range from box models of the geologic carbon and oxygen cycles, planetary thermostats, and atmospheric oxygenation, to box models of Cenozoic seawater chemistry (Mg and Ca), to 1D diffusion-reaction modes of the dynamics of carbon and oxygen in sedimentary systems.

 

GHP 301 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

You Are What You Eat: Bio-Cultural Explorations of Food and Health

Jessica Ham 

Why are people committed to the “Paleo” diet in the 21st Century? Why do we apply the title “comfort” to certain foods? This class will use anthropology as a platform to explore how diverse health outcomes are connected to the foods we do (and do not) eat. While we will consider how food is implicated in individual health outcomes (such as malnutrition and chronic disease), we will also explore food and diet at an evolutionary scale. Shaping these explorations will be a sharp critical lens that considers how culture shapes our perceptions of food and health and how power intersects in our ability to so access those needs and preferences.

 

GHP 350 / WWS 380 / ANT 380 (SA)   na, npdf

Critical Perspectives in Global Health

João Biehl 

Global health brings together a vast array of actors working to address urgent health issues worldwide with unprecedented financial and technological resources. This course is a critical analysis of the cultural, social, political and economic processes related to this expanding medical and humanitarian field. As we scrutinize the evidence-making practices, agendas and value systems informing global health, we will place current interventions in historical perspective and gauge their benefits and unintended consequences. Students are encouraged to find new and collaborative ways to understand and act in and through the field of global health.

 

* HIS 303 / LAS 305 (HA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Colonial Latin America to 1810

Vera S. Candiani 

This course begins with the origins and consolidation of the Aztec, Inca and Iberian polities and ends with the severance of colonial ties. It combines an overview of the political economy of the region over three centuries with a study of how social groups interacted among themselves and with imperial rule over time through accommodation and conflict. We pay special attention to comparisons and contrasts — centers and frontiers of settlement, urban and rural life, indigenous and African populations, religion and transgression, Portuguese and Spanish models of rule — and to long-term processes and implications of environmental change.

 

* HIS 314 / AFS 313 (HA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Precolonial Africa

Emmanuel H. Kreike 

The course explores the rich history of the African continent before colonial occupation during the 19th century. It concentrates on people and civilizations indigenous to Africa, focusing on ancient civilizations as well as on the expanse of Islam and the Atlantic slave trade. Travelers’ accounts, epics, and archaeological evidence reveal diversity of African culture.

 

* HIS 373 (HA)   No Pass/D/Fail

Democracy and Slavery in the New Nation

Robert S. Wilentz 

An interpretive history of the United States from the ratification of the Constitution to the coming of the Civil War. The course will cover politics and social development, while emphasizing focused reading of primary documents. Topics will include the debate over the Federal Constitution, the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, the rise of cotton slavery, Jacksonian democracy and the growth of political parties, antislavery and reform, westward expansion, and the growing social and political divisions between North and South.

 

* HIS 388 / URB 388 (HA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Unrest and Renewal in Urban America

Alison E. Isenberg 

For centuries cities have embodied U.S. hopes and fears, symbolizing ideals of democratic melting pots and cultural innovation, as well as urban “problems” and crisis. Urban life distilled extremes like rich and poor; parks and skyscrapers; philanthropy and greed; racial and ethnic divides; violence and hope; center and suburb. By producing contrasts and conflicts, cities brokered transformation, rebellion and renewal. Course covers social life, politics, economy, revolutionary ideologies, culture, race, gender, and the built environment–from the colonial era to the present.

 

* LAS 371 / SPA 372 / AAS 374 (SA)   na, npdf

Cuban History, Politics and Culture

Adrian Lopez-Denis 

This seminar constitutes an introduction to the study of Cuba from a historical perspective. During the first half of the semester the course follows a chronological approach, covering the political and socioeconomic development of the country from the sixteenth century to the present. In the second half of the semester, it examines a series of sociocultural issues that are central to the life of contemporary Cubans, on the island and abroad. At the core of the class lies an interrogation of the relevance of the Cuban case for larger discussions on colonialism, modernity, socialism and development.

 

* LAS 372 / GHP 372 / SPA 373 (SA)   na, npdf

Public Health and Private Healing in the Atlantic World

Adrian Lopez-Denis 

This seminar explores the impact of transatlantic exchanges between Europe, Africa and the Americas on the development of the environmental, political and sociocultural trends that affect our health and our ability to heal today. During the first half of the semester we will reconstruct the interconnected histories of the medicalization of the West and the westernization of the Rest, from the Renaissance to the end of the twentieth century. In the second half of the semester we will explore the contemporary consequences of these historical developments.

 

* MED 227 / HUM 227 (LA)   No Audit

The World of the Middle Ages

Daniela E. Mairhofer 

An introduction to medieval culture in Western Europe from the end of the classical world to ca. 1400. The course focuses on themes such as the medieval concepts of self, humanity, and God; nation-building, conquest and crusade; relations among Christians, Jews, and Moslems; literacy, heresy, and the rise of vernacular literature; gender, chivalry, and the medieval court. Material approached through various cultural forms and media; several lectures by invited guest lecturers. Seminar discussion format with some lecturing.

 

* MOL 380A (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Modern Microbiology and Disease

Martin C. Jonikas 
Liz Wright 

Microbiology is a broad subject that encompasses medicine, the earth’s environment, and industry. This course will investigate the evolution of microbes, their requirements for growth, and aspects of their metabolism. The importance of microbes in industry, recombinant engineering, and genomics will also be addressed. On the medical front, we depend on microbes for our survival but also must content with deadly pathogens. Topics will include the study of microorganisms in selected areas of infectious disease, with a focus on viral, bacterial, and parasitic modes of action.

 

MOL 459 / GHP 459 (STN)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Viruses: Strategy and Tactics

Lynn W. Enquist 

Viruses are unique parasites of living cells and may be the most abundant, highest evolved life forms on the planet. The general strategies encoded by all known viral genomes are discussed using selected viruses as examples. The first half of the course covers the molecular biology (the tactics) inherent in these strategies. The second half introduces the biology of engagement of viruses with host defenses, what happens when viral infection leads to disease, vaccines and antiviral drugs, and the evolution of infectious agents and emergence of new viruses.

 

MOL 460 / STC 460 / GHP 460   na, npdf

Diseases in Children: Causes, Costs, and Choices

Daniel A. Notterman 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Within a broader context of historical, social, and ethical concerns, a survey of normal childhood development and selected disorders from the perspectives of the physician and the scientist. Emphasis on the complex relationship between genetic and acquired causes of disease, medical practice, social conditions, and cultural values. The course features visits from children with some of the conditions discussed, site visits, and readings from the original medical and scientific literature. Prerequisite: 214 or 215. Two 90-minute classes and an evening 90-minute precept.

 

* NES 251 / HIS 251 / JDS 251 (HA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

The World of the Cairo Geniza

Marina Rustow 

The importance of the Cairo Geniza, a cache of texts discovered in the attic of a medieval Egyptian synagogue, goes beyond Jewish history, crossing the breadth of the medieval world and offering an intimate view of commerce, slavery, heresy and seafaring; of what people wore, ate, rode, believed and did all day; of who married whom and why; of a Shi’ite state ruling over Sunnis, Christians and Jews; and of a society that remains the best documented of its period. Students in the course will read unpublished primary sources to gain an insider’s glimpse of what we can know and can’t know in premodern history.

 

* URB 385 / SOC 385 / HUM 385 / ARC 385 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Mapping Gentrification

Aaron P. Shkuda 

This seminar introduces the study of gentrification, with a focus on mapping projects using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) software. Readings, films, and site visits will situate the topic, as the course examines how racial landscapes of gentrification, culture and politics have been influenced by and helped drive urban change. Tutorials in ArcGIS will allow students to convert observations of urban life into fresh data and work with existing datasets. Learn to read maps critically, undertake multifaceted spatial analysis, and master new cartographic practices associated with emerging scholarship in the Digital and Urban Humanities.

 

* WWS 306 / ECO 329 / ENV 319 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Environmental Economics

Smita B. Brunnermeier 

Course introduces use of economics in understanding both the sources of and the remedies to environmental and resource allocation problems. It emphasizes the reoccurrence of economic phenomena like public goods, externalities, market failure and imperfect information. Students learn about the design and evaluation of environmental policy instruments, the political economy of environmental policy, and the valuation of environmental and natural resource services. The concepts are illustrated in a variety of applications from domestic pollution of air, water and land to international issues such as global warming and sustainable development.

 

WWS 307 / ECO 349 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Public Economics

Elizabeth C. Bogan 

The role of government in promoting efficiency and equity in the U.S. economy. Conditions when markets fail to be efficient. Problems with government allocation of resources. Economic analysis and public policies regarding health care, education, poverty, the environment, financial regulations and other important issues.

 

WWS 340 / PSY 321 (EC)   na, npdf

The Psychology of Decision Making and Judgment

Eldar Shafir 

An introduction to the logic and research findings underlying decision-making and judgment under uncertainty. The focus is on the contrast between the normative theory of judgment and choice, and the psychological principles that guide decision behavior, often producing biases and errors. Among other topics, we will consider political, medical, and financial decision-making, poverty, negotiations, and the law, along with the implications of the findings for the rational agent model typically assumed in economics, throughout the social sciences, and in policy making.

 

* WWS 370 / POL 308 / CHV 301 (EM)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Ethics and Public Policy

Stephen J. Macedo 

The course examines major moral controversies in public life and differing conceptions of justice and the common good. It seeks to help students develop the skills required for thinking and writing about the ethical considerations that ought to shape public institutions, guide public authorities, and inform the public’s judgments. The course will focus on issues that are particularly challenging for advanced, pluralist democracies such as the USA, including justice in war, terrorism and torture, paternalism, markets and distributive justice, immigration, and refugees and the place, if any, of religious arguments in politics.

 

WWS 385 / AMS 350 (SA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Civil Society and Public Policy

Stanley N. Katz 

Civil society is the arena of voluntary organizations (churches, social welfare organizations, sporting clubs) and communal activity. Scholars now tell us that such voluntary and cooperative activities create “social capital” — a stock of mutual trust that forms the glue that holds society together. The course will be devoted to the study of the history of these concepts, and to the analysis of their application to the United States and other societies. This will be an interdisciplinary effort, embracing history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, and other disciplines.

 

WWS 501   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

The Politics of Public Policy

Lisa Anderson 
Scott M. Guenther 
Andrew Moravcsik 
Jonathan F. Mummolo 

An analysis of the forces that shape the behavior of public organizations and individuals in organizational settings. The emphasis is on the workings of U.S. governmental agencies. Special attention is given to writing skills as they apply to the roles of advisers and decision makers in public-sector organizations.

 

WWS 537 / SOC 537   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Social Organization of Cities

Douglas S. Massey 

A review of the historical emergence and social evolution of cities and urban life. Course presents current theories regarding the ecological and social structure of urban areas, and how urban social organization affects the behavior and well-being of human beings who live and work in cities.

 

WWS 541   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

International Politics

G. John Ikenberry 

This course introduces competing theories of international relations and evaluates their explanation of foreign policy decisions and general patterns in international relations over the last century. Broadly covering security policy and international political economy, topics include the causes of war, the role of international organizations to promote cooperation, and the interaction between domestic actors and governments in negotiations on trade and the environment.

 

WWS 542   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

International Economics

Silvia Weyerbrock 

Survey course in international economics for non-specialists. The first half covers microeconomic topics such as trade theory and policy, multilateral trade negotiations and regional economic integration. The second half addresses macroeconomic topics such as current account imbalances, exchange rates, and international financial crises. The course stresses concepts and real-world applications rather than formal models. Prerequisite: 511b and 512b (concurrently).

 

WWS 543   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

International Trade Policy

Stephen J. Redding 

Evaluates arguments for and against protection and adjustment assistance and considers topics chosen from the following: non-tariff barriers, dumping, embargo threats and trade warfare, and the political economy of trade policy formation. Special attention is given to trade problems of the less-developed countries, including North-South trade relations and commodity price stabilization. Prerequisite: 511c.

 

WWS 564 / POP 564   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Poverty, Inequality and Health in the World

Anne C. Case 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

About well-being throughout the world, with focus on income and health. Explores what happened to poverty, inequality, and health, in the US, and internationally. Discusses conceptual foundations of national and global measures of inequality, poverty, and health; construction of measures, and extent to which they can be trusted; relationship between globalization, poverty, and health, historically and currently. Examines links between health and income, why poor people are less healthy and live less long than rich people.

 

WWS 590A / ECO 581L   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Economic Perspectives on Inequality (Half-Term)

Marc Fleurbaey 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Economics is centrally concerned with models of human capital development, educational attainment, labor market dynamics, unemployment, labor turnover, job duration, wage setting institutions, the role of unions, human capital formation, the relationship between economic status and other aspects of well-being (including health). Economists are essential partners in the behavioral study of preferences and decision making, mobility and redistribution, and the institutions of industrial relations that govern the labor market.

 

WWS 591D   No Pass/D/Fail

Policy Workshop – Slums and Service Delivery in India

Jeffrey S. Hammer 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Urbanization is a central characteristic of successful developing countries. However, it comes with the challenges of housing migrants who are often relatively poor. This has led to large urban slums with uncertain property rights and weak claims to public services. This workshop examines the case of Indian cities, particularly Delhi and Ludhiana, that are trying to cope with large and growing informal settlements and how the residents get public services such as water, sanitation, solid waste collection, police, schools, electricity, healthcare, etc.

 

WWS 593H   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Topics in Policy Analysis (Half-Term) – Policymaking in Diverse Societies

Rafaela M. Dancygier 

This course investigates how ethnic diversity influences the policymaking process in democratic societies, with a focus on Europe and the United States. We first address why and how ethnic diversity shapes individuals’ and groups’ beliefs, preferences, and behaviors in ways that shape the formulation of policy. Next the course examines the consequences of ethnic diversity on policy areas that all societies confront (such as redistribution and economic development) as well as policy areas that emerge as a result of diversity (such as affirmative action or immigrant integration).
 -30-
Years past:

AAS 223 / ENG 232/ GSS 223: Literature, Food, and the American Racial Diet

Food, like books, is the site of our greatest consumption of and most vulnerable encounter with “otherness.” This course explores how “taste” informs the ways in which we ingest or dispel racial otherness. Through novels and cinema largely in Asian American and African American cultural production and in the Asian and African diaspora– we will study how the meeting of food and word inform categories such as race, nationhood, gender, ecology, and family, and class. Topics include: “Transcendental Primitivism,” “Modernist Orientalism,” “Chocolate Women on the Edge”, “Parenting/Consuming”, “Ecology and the Humanimal,” and more. Here’s a story about the class. Anne Cheng (aacheng@Princeton.EDU)

ANT 203 (SA): Economic Life in Cultural Context

This course explores the social and cultural contexts of economic experience in the US and around the world. It considers how the consumption, production, and circulation of goods–today and in times past–become invested with personal and collective meanings. It pays special attention to symbolic and political dimensions of work, property (material, intellectual, and cultural), wealth, and “taste” (i.e., needs and wants). Additionally, course participants do a bit of anthropological fieldwork by learning to draw everyday experiences systematically into conversation with more familiar academic and media sources. Rena S. Lederman (lederman@Princeton.EDU)

ANT 362: Foodways: Biocultural Aspects of Human Diet (SA)

Foodways is a biocultural exploration of human food consumption. Readings and discussions will focus on both the biological and socio-cultural aspects of what humans eat and the ways human cultures conceptualize food and its consumption. Topics include the nutritional needs of humans, the differences between diet and cuisine, which foods taste good and why some foods taste disgusting, the evolution of human diet, how cultures define what is and what is not food, the symbolism associated with various kinds of food, and how cultures distinguish foods that are suitable for some members of the society and not others. Alan E. Mann (mann@Princeton.EDU)

ARC 208 / ENE 202 / EGR 208 / ENV 206 (STN): Designing Sustainable Systems – Applying the Science of Sustainability to Address Global Change

The course presents anthropogenic global changes and their impact on sustainable design. The course focuses on the mechanistic understanding of the underlying principles based in simple concepts from natural and applied sciences. Based on a reflection of successes and failures, it indicates the feasibility of the necessary changes and critically discusses alternatives. The material is presented in 2 parts: 1) Global Change and Environmental Impacts: studying our influences on basic natural systems and cycles, and 2) Designing Sustainable Systems: studying potential solutions to these challenges through an applied design project. Forrest M. Meggers (fmeggers@princeton.edu)

CBE418 / ENE 418: Fundamentals of Biofuels

This course defines biofuels, and explains why we should make them. It presents the challenges and opportunities of sustainable biofuels, addressing issues of land use, and competition with food production. It describes production processes of first generation, and cellulosic ethanol. It covers microbial engineering to improve production, or make new advanced biofuels. It describes the use of photosynthetic organisms such as algae, which fix carbon directly from the atmosphere to make biofuels. It addresses the environmental, economic and societal impact of biofuels, and how they can fulfill their promise as a renewable source of energy. José L. Avalos (javalos@princeton.edu)

CBE 335 / MAE 338 / ENV 335 / ENE 335 The Energy Water Nexus

Students will gain an awareness of challenges to sustainable water and energy and inter-linkages between these. Energy-water design trade-offs will be investigated for various energy and water processing facilities, e.g., electric power and desalination plants. Students will design and simulate a river-reservoir system and assess management and regulatory options. Lectures will include a review of tools for lifecycle environmental and economic analysis, and discussion of contemporary issues where the energy-water nexus plays a critical role. Fabian Wagner (fwagner@princeton.edu)

ANT 364 / ENV 364 (SA) The Politics of Nature

In this course we will consider the social and political life of nature from an anthropological perspective. How are our ideas about nature historically and culturally produced? What is the relationship between resource control and the consolidation of power? From the work of conservation NGOs (nonprofit organizations) to laboratory-produced GMOs (genetically modified organisms), we will explore how notions of pristine wilderness, polluting people, and ethical business are produced and contested. Course themes range from the lived effects of extractive industries to nature as both a commodity and the grounds for claiming political rights. Susan H. Ellison

CEE 306 (STN): Hydrology

Analysis of fundamental processes in the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, streamflow and groundwater flow. James A. Smith (jsmith@Princeton.EDU)

CEE 307 / EEB 305 (STL): Water, Energy, and Ecosystems

This three-week course, offered as part of a four-course study abroad semester, takes place at Princeton University’s Mpala Research Centre in central Kenya. The course will provide an introduction to the principles of hydrological sciences through the development and application of instrumentation for characterizing surface/subsurface hydrological dynamics in field settings. Lectures and field activities will address the theory of operation, design, and implementation of methods used to quantify hydrological patterns and processes. Kelly K. Caylor (kcaylor@princeton.edu)

CEE 301 / ENV 303 / URB 303 (STN): Introduction to Environmental Engineering
The course introduces the basic chemical and physical processes of relevance in environmental engineering. Mass and energy balance and transport concepts are introduced and the chemical principles governing reaction kinetics and phase partitioning are presented. We then turn our focus to the applications in environmental engineering problems related to water and air pollution. Ian C. Bourg (bourg@princeton.edu)

CEE 302 / ENV 302 / EEB 302: Practical Models for Environmental Systems

Humans are increasingly affecting environmental systems throughout the world. This course uses quantitative analysis to examine three of today’s most pressing issues: energy, water, and food. Each issue is examined from perspectives of natural and engineered ecosystems that depend on complex interactions among physical, chemical, and biological processes. The course is an introduction for students in the natural sciences and engineering pursuing an advanced program in environmental studies. We emphasize quantitative analyses with applications to a wide range of systems, and the design of engineered solutions to major environmental problems Michael A. Celia (celia@Princeton.EDU), Lars O. Hedin (lhedin@Princeton.EDU)

CEE 311 / CHM 311 / GEO 311 / ENE 311: Global Air Pollution

Students will study the chemical and physical processes involved in the sources, transformation, transport, and sinks of air pollutants on local to global scales. Societal problems such as photochemical smog, particulate matter, greenhouse gases, and stratospheric ozone depletion will be investigated using fundamental concepts in chemistry, physics, and engineering. For the class project, students will select a trace gas species or family of gases and analyze recent field and remote sensing data based upon material covered in the course. Environments to be studied include very clean, remote portions of the globe to urban air quality. Mark A. Zondlo (mzondlo@Princeton.EDU)

CEE 460 (QR): Risk Analysis

Fundamentals of probabilistic risk analysis. Stochastic modeling of hazards. Estimation of extremes. Vulnerability modeling of natural and built environment. Evaluation of failure chances and consequences. Reliability analysis. Decision analysis and risk management. Case studies involving natural hazards, including earthquakes, extreme winds, rainfall flooding, storm surges, hurricanes, and climate change, and their induced damage and economic losses. Ning Lin (nlin@princeton.edu)

CEE 471 / GEO 471 / URB 471 (STN): Introduction to Water Pollution Technology
An introduction to the science of water quality management and pollution control in natural systems; fundamentals of biological and chemical transformations in natural waters; indentification of sources of pollution; water and wastewater treatment methods; fundamentals of water quality modeling. Peter R. Jaffé (jaffe@Princeton.EDU)

CEE 477 / ENE 477 (STN): Engineering Design for Sustainable Development

Students will design several features of a LEED-certified building project. Features that will be considered include ground source heat pumps; ventilation; photovoltaics (PV); insulation; glazing; green materials; and storm water management systems, including a green roof, and rainwater harvesting. Ventilation will be designed considering the potential for vapor emissions from building materials. Energy software will be used to determine the carbon footprint and energy costs of alternative designs. Stephen Song (ss28@princeton.edu)

CEE 490 /ENE 490: Mathematical Modeling of Energy and Environmental Systems

This course explores the social and cultural contexts of economic experience in the US and around the world. It considers how the consumption, production, and circulation of goods–today and in times past–become invested with personal and collective meanings. It pays special attention to symbolic and political dimensions of work, property (material, intellectual, and cultural), wealth, and “taste” (i.e., needs and wants). Additionally, course participants do a bit of anthropological fieldwork by learning to draw everyday experiences systematically into conversation with more familiar academic and media sources. Staff

CEE 599: Special Topics in Environmental Engineering and Water Resources – Ecohydrology of Plant Water Use

The course focuses on the quantitative modelling of the joint stochastic dynamics of soil moisture and plant biomass under different hydrologic conditions and plant physiological responses. Models of tree/grass competition with differentiated water use strategies are coupled with stochastic hydrologic inputs linking hydrologic dynamics and physiological response. Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe (rodrigu@Princeton.EDU)

CHM 333 / ENV 333 / GEO 333 (STN): Oil to Ozone: Chemistry of the Environment

The chemical background of environmental issues. Topics include energy and fuels, global change, ozone, air pollution, chemistry of natural waters, pesticides, and heavy metals. François Morel (morel@princeton.edu), Anne M. Morel-Kraepiel (kraepiel@Princeton.EDU)

CHM 418 / GEO 418: Environmental Aqueous Geochemistry

Application of quantitative chemical principles to the study of natural waters. Includes equilibrium computations, carbonate system, gas exchange, precipitation/dissolution of minerals, coordination of trace metals, redox reactions in water and sediments. François Morel (morel@princeton.edu)

CHV 301 / WWS 370 / POL 308: Ethics and Public Policy

The course examines major moral controversies in public life and differing conceptions of justice and the common good. It seeks to help students develop the skills required for thinking and writing about the ethical considerations that ought to shape public institutions, guide public authorities, and inform the public’s judgments. The course will focus on issues that are particularly challenging for advanced, pluralist democracies such as the USA, including justice in war, terrorism and torture, paternalism, markets and distributive justice, abortion, the law of marriage and the place, if any, of religious arguments in politics. Stephen J. Macedo (macedo@Princeton.EDU)

CHV 261 / REL 261: Christian Ethics and Modern Society

An introduction to Christian ideals of conduct, character, & community, & to modern disputes over their interpretation & application. Are Christian virtues & principles fundamentally at odds with the ethos of liberal democracy oriented toward rights, equality, & freedom? What do Christian beliefs & moral concepts imply about issues related to feminism, racism, & pluralism? What is the relationship between religious convictions, morality, & law? Special emphasis on selected political & economic problems, sexuality & marriage, bioethics, capital punishment, the environment, war, terrorism & torture, & the role of religion in public life. Eric S. Gregory (gregory@Princeton.EDU)

CHV 318 / HUM 316 / PHI 316 / SOC 318 (EM): Social Philosophy

A systematic study of philosophical questions pertaining to social phenomena. We will begin with ontological questions, such as whether and how we can say that a group exists or that it has certain beliefs and desires; then turn to questions concerning explanation, such as whether social science can ever be value-neutral; and end by addressing normative questions pertaining to our obligation to obey the law, the nature and value of patriotism, the moral responsibilities of corporations, the critique of social categories like race and gender, and the ideal of socialism. Jonathan P. Thakkar (jthakkar@princeton.edu)

CHV 416 / POL 416: Moral Conflicts in Public and Private Life

The distinction between public and private spheres of life is both foundational to modern liberal democratic politics and also fraught with controversy. This course examines such conflicts in the context of political theory, ethics, law, and public policy, including the tense interface between public values and religious conscience and practice, and the scope of freedom with respect to marriage, family, and sexual relations. How broad are the claims of private liberty and what is the nature and extent of legitimate public authority when it comes to activities claimed to be private? Can paternalist and perfectionist policies ever be justified? Stephen J. Macedo (macedo@Princeton.EDU)

ECO 329 / ENV 319 / WWS 306 (SA): Environmental Economics

Course introduces use of economics in understanding both the sources of and the remedies to environmental and resource allocation problems. It emphasizes the reoccurrence of economic phenomena like public goods, externalities, market failure and imperfect information. Students learn about the design and evaluation of environmental policy instruments, the political economy of environmental policy, and the valuation of environmental and natural resource services. The concepts are illustrated in a variety of applications from domestic pollution of air, water and land to international issues such as global warming and sustainable development. Smita B. Brunnermeier (smita@Princeton.EDU)

ECO 343: Economic Inequality and the Role of Government

In the US and many other developed countries, economic inequality has risen to historic levels in recent decades. What are the causes of this trend — “natural” market forces (e.g., globalization?) or changes in public policy (e.g., erosion of the minimum wage)? Are measures currently proposed to counteract inequality and poverty — e.g, progressive taxation, transfer programs to low-income families, public insurance programs such as Medicare — effective? An emphasis is placed on understanding what basic microeconomic theory as well as empirical evidence can (and cannot) tell us about these questions. Ilyana Kuziemko (kuziemko@Princeton.EDU)

ECO 355: Economics of Food and Agriculture

Hunger and under-nutrition are widespread in poor countries while an obesity crisis is growing in rich countries. Rural-urban income inequality occurs throughout the world and farming and food industry practices everywhere have significant adverse effects on public health and the environment/climate. What are the economic causes of these problems? Are agricultural, food, nutrition and environmental policy measures currently proposed to deal with these problems effective? This course uses theoretical and empirical economic analysis to study the agricultural and food sector and related government policies in rich and poor countries. Silvia Weyerbrock (sweyerbr@Princeton.EDU)

ECO 372 / EPS 342 (SA): Economics Europe – Economics of the European Union and Economies in Europe

Europe is at a crossroads. Political and economic integration in the European Union (EU) exceeds levels reached in other parts of the world. Economic integration not only affects trade but agriculture, competition, regions, energy, and money. Most euro areas economies have been struggling with interlocking crises involving debt, banking and growth, which challenge the viability of monetary union and threaten much of what has been achieved since 1945. This course studies economic integration in Europe, the ongoing euro crisis, and economic challenges facing EU member countries. It uses economic analysis to study policy issues. Silvia Weyerbrock (sweyerbr@Princeton.EDU)

EEB 308: Conservation Biology

An in-depth exposure to topics in conservation biology emphasizing the application of scientific concepts to our understanding of the problems that threaten endangered species and ecosystems. Topics include island biogeography, population genetics and viability, landscape ecology, reserve design, and endangered species recovery. To a lesser degree, this course will address some of the political, economic, and cultural aspects of conservation. Martha M. Hurley (mmhurley@Princeton.EDU)

EEB 313: Behavioral Ecology

How does a swarm of honeybees collectively decide on a new site for their hive? When a mother mouse protects her young, are her behaviors genetically determined? Why do ravens share food with each other? This course is an introduction to behavioral ecology, which asks why animals act the way they do, how their behaviors have been shaped by natural selection, and how these behaviors influence their surroundings. We will first discuss behaviors at the individual level, then move to reproductive behaviors. The final section of the course will focus on social evolution, the origins of cooperation, and human behavioral ecology. Christina P. Riehl (criehl@Princeton.EDU)

EEB 321: Ecology: Species Interactions, Biodiversity and Society

How do wild organisms interact with each other, their physical environments, and human societies? Lectures will examine a series of fundamental topics in ecology–herbivory, predation, competition, mutualism, species invasions, biogeographic patterns, extinction, climate change, and conservation, among others–through the lens of case studies drawn from all over the world. Readings will provide background information necessary to contextualize these case studies and clarify the linkages between them. Laboratories and fieldwork will explore the process of translating observations and data into an understanding of how the natural world works. Robert M. Pringle (pringle@Princeton.EDU)

EEB 341, ENV341: Water, Savannas and Society: Global Change and Sustainability in Africa’s Hallmark Ecosystem

Savannas have played an important role in shaping human societies, including our evolution as a species. That role will grow, as savannas must be increasingly harnessed to meet growing demands for food, fuel, and fiber. Starting with a primer on savanna ecology, this course will examine the ecological and societal issues surrounding our use of African savannas. A key focus will be to explore tradeoffs between agricultural development, ecosystem services (e.g. carbon storage), biodiversity, and existing livelihoods, how those tradeoffs can be optimized to achieve sustainability, and how climate change will complicate such efforts. Lyndon D. Estes (lestes@princeton.edu)

EEB 504: Fundamental Concepts in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior II

An advanced foundation in ecology, focusing on the 50 fundamental papers, is given. Topics include dynamics and structure of populations, communities and ecosystems, and conservation biology. (This is a core course.) Peter Andolfatto (pandolfa@Princeton.EDU),
Andrew P. Dobson (dobber@Princeton.EDU), Andrea L. Graham (algraham@Princeton.EDU), Bryan T. Grenfell (grenfell@Princeton.EDU), Lars O. Hedin (lhedin@Princeton.EDU), C. Jessica E. Metcalf (cmetcalf@Princeton.EDU), Stephen W. Pacala (pacala@Princeton.EDU), Robert M. Pringle (rpringle@Princeton.EDU), Daniel I. Rubenstein (dir@Princeton.EDU), Corina E. Tarnita (ctarnita@princeton.edu), David S. Wilcove (dwilcove@Princeton.EDU), Bridgett M. vonHoldt (vonholdt@princeton.edu)

EGR 277 / SOC 277 / HIS 277 (SA): Technology and Society

Technology and society are unthinkable without each other – each provides the means and framework in which the other develops. To explore this dynamic, this course investigates a wide array of questions on the interaction between technology, society, politics, and economics, emphasizing the themes of innovation and maturation, systems and regulation, risk and failure, and ethics and expertise. Specific topics covered include nuclear power and waste, genetically-modified organisms, regulation of the internet, medical mistakes, intellectual property, the financial crisis of 2008, and the post-fossil-fuels economy. Janet A. Vertesi (jvertesi@Princeton.EDU)

EGR 498 / GHP 498: Special Topics in Social Entrepreneurship – Ventures to Address Global Challenges

Course focuses on how entrepreneurial ventures – as compared with international aid programs, private philanthropy and corporate social responsibility initiatives – can potentially address major global challenges such as widespread poverty, intractable disease, health policy, slum housing and global warming that affect the lives and well-being of billions. After overview of selected global challenges and the fundamentals of entrepreneurship, will explore emerging and established ventures in each of these challenge arenas in more detail. Classes: combination of lectures and case discussions, interspersed with conversations with entrepreneurs. John D. Danner (jdanner@Princeton.EDU)

ENE 561 / WWS 586C: The Psychology of Environmental Decision Making

An introduction to the field of behavioral science and how it is used in practice to study and change how people make decisions about environmental problems. We explore how people psychologically understand and process environmental risks and how such perceptions influence behavioral decision-making. Students explore the social-psychological foundations of pro-environmental values, attitudes and norms and how to design public policy interventions to improve environmental decision-making. Public understanding of science and behavioral strategies for effective environmental science communication and engagement are also discussed. Sander L. van der Linden (sander.vanderlinden@princeton.edu)

ENV STO5: Investigating an Ethical Approach to Sustainability at Princeton

As Princeton University shapes its 2026 Campus Plan, students will study the multi-dimensional ethical consequences of sustainability decision-making and implementation. Students will study various facets of campus and sustainability planning, ethical and moral frameworks around human relationships with nature, and modern global conditions and forecasting. Students will produce a series of research-driven position papers outlining what directive principles should be applied when making planning decisions in areas such as energy, waste, water, food, and communications. The papers will inform campus planning. Shana S. Weber (shanaw@Princeton.EDU)

ENV 201B /STC 201B (STL): Fundamentals of Environmental Studies: Population, Land Use, Biodiversity, and Energy

An expanding human population and the desire of all people for a more prosperous life have placed tremendous demands on the environment. We will explore how human activities have affected land use, agriculture, fisheries, biodiversity, and the use of energy. Our focus is both global and local, highlighting not only fundamental changes in the biosphere, but also the ways in which individual decisions lead to major environmental changes. We explore the fundamental principles underlying contemporary environmental issues, and we use case studies to illustrate the scientific, political, economic, and social dimensions of environmental problems. Kelly Caylor (kcaylor@princeton.edu), David Wilcove (dwilcove@princeton.edu)

ENV 306 (HA): Topics in Environmental Studies – American Environmental History

Explores the diverse connections between America’s national development and natural environment. It examines how the U.S. originated, then expanded to cover a continental land mass, and the ways that expansion changed the nation. It analyzes how, why, and with what consequences major parts of the U.S. economy–for instance, farming, energy, services and government–have grown or in shrunk. It looks at how and with what results the U.S. has incorporated different ethnic and racial groups. It shows how, why, and with what outcomes it has historically globalized and conducted its foreign policy, and offers insights into current landscapes. Deborah E. Popper (dpopper@Princeton.EDU), Frank J. Popper (fpopper@princeton.edu)

ENV 331 / GEO 363 / CHM 331: Environmental Geochemistry: Chemistry of the Natural Systems

Covers topics including origin of elements; formation of the Earth; evolution of the atmosphere and oceans; atomic theory and chemical bonding; crystal chemistry and ionic substitution in crystals; reaction equilibria and kinetics in aqueous and biological systems; chemistry of high-temperature melts and crystallization process; and chemistry of the atmosphere, soil, marine and riverine environments. The biogeochemistry of contaminants and their influence on the environment will also be discussed. Satish C. Myneni (smyneni@Princeton.EDU)

ENV 342 (No Audit): Agriculture and Food Security

This course provides an understanding of the complex and challenging public health issue of food security in a world where one billion people are under-nourished, while another billion are overweight. Topics explore the connections among diet, the current food and food animal production systems, the environment and public health, considering factors such as economics, population and equity. Lectures, discussions and case studies will examine these complex relationships and alternative approaches to achieving both local and global food security and the important role public health can play. Eileen Zerba

ENV 407: Africans Feeding Africa

This course will explore the economic, environmental, and social challenges of meeting growing food needs in sub-Saharan Africa. The region today has the lowest crop yields, the highest percentage of hungry people, and the highest population growth rates, and relies heavily on firewood for energy. The region also has vast areas of environmentally valuable forests and savannas. It has technical opportunities to produce crops better but faces challenges from high rainfall variability and climate change. Timothy D. Searchinger (Princeton Studies Food founder) (tsearchi@princeton.edu)

FRS 138 Science, Society & Dinner (STN)

A new program of hands-on culinary lab classes and resultant communal dinners that illustrate and amplify trans-disciplinary coursework in science, engineering, public policy, humanities and social sciences — while teaching self-reliance and food literacy. Interspersed with lecture, students, under the direction of a five-star chef, prepare curriculum-specific meals together to exacting standards, learning basic (and not-so-basic) technique, background, critical thinking and discernment as applied to gastronomy, culinary theory, seasonality, palate development, human physiology and across academic disciplines. Multiple instructors with each lab co-taught by Master Chef Craig Shelton, Yale ’82 MB&B, five-star chef/restaurateur, a James Beard Best Chef award recipient. Kelly Caylor (kcaylor@princeton.edu)

GEO 202 (STL): Ocean, Atmosphere, and Climate

An introduction to the ocean, atmosphere, and climate from the perspective of oceanography. Covers coastal processes including waves, beaches, tides and ecosystems; open ocean processes including atmospheric circulation and its impact on the surface ocean, the wind driven circulation, and surface ocean ecosystems; and the abyssal ocean including circulation, the cycling of chemicals, and ocean sediments and what they tell us about the climate history of the earth. The final part of the course will cover humans and the earth system, including a discussion of ocean resources and climate change. Jorge L. Sarmiento (jls@Princeton.EDU), Danielle M. Schmitt (dschmitt@Princeton.EDU)

GEO 430 Climate and the Terrestrial Biosphere

Earth’s climate is tightly coupled to the terrestrial biosphere. In this course, we will explore the key mechanisms that link climate (e.g., cloudiness, rainfall, and temperature) with the terrestrial biosphere, and how these mechanisms are altered by humans. We will review land-atmosphere exchanges of energy, water and carbon dioxide. We will then analyze the processes controlling the land carbon sink, with a strong focus on seasonality. We will investigate the potential impacts of climate change on vegetation seasonality and the land carbon sink. Assignments will include analysis of observational datasets and climate model simulations. David M. Medvigy (dmedvigy@Princeton.EDU)

GHP 405 / ANT 481: Energy and Health: From Exhausted Bodies to Energy Crises

In this course, we will consider how the production and consumption of energy are linked to questions of health. We will examine how philosophers, public health scholars, filmmakers, anthropologists, historians and even novelists have thought about energy. This class will treat energy as a broad concept, ranging from the metabolic productions of the body to the carbon fixations of democracy. We will also examine what energy sustainability might mean in the face of repeated infrastructure failure and the concurrent loss of life. Finally, we will look to the past and present of nuclear energy as a course of hope and a looming threat. Bharat J. Venkat (bvenkat@princeton.edu)

GSS 543 / POL 543: Interest Groups and Social Movements in American Politics and Policy

This course engages theoretical and empirical work about interest groups and social movements in American politics and policy-making. We examine theories of interest group and social movement formation, maintenance and decline; how interest groups and social movements attempt to influence public policy; the impact of interest groups and social movements; lobbying; the relationships between interest groups and the three branches of the federal government; interest groups, elections, campaign finance, PACs, and 527s; and the effectiveness of interest groups and social movements as agents of democratic representation. Dara Z. Strolovitch (dzs@princeton.edu)

HIS 507: Environmental History

The course examines the processes of environmental change and the causes and effects of change. Class readings expose participants to different models and approaches to the study of environmental change. The class readings draw from different historical periods and different parts of the world, including Europe, Africa, the Americas, and Asia. The course critically assesses the paradigms and models underlying the analysis and description of environmental change and explores alternative ways of understanding and narrating environmental change. Emmanuel H. Kreike (kreike@Princeton.EDU)

ISC 335: Organic Chemistry of Metabolism

A rigorous one-semester introduction to the organic chemical reactions of greatest biological importance, taught through the lens of metabolism. Covers organic mechanisms underlying fundamental enzyme-catalyzed reactions and quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics and metabolic networks. For quantitatively-inclined students interested in biology, this course is an alternative to the standard two-semester organic chemistry sequence (CHM303/304). Does not replace CHM303/304 for Chemistry majors. Satisfies the organic chemistry requirement for Molecular Biology majors and provides appropriate preparation for subsequent studies in Biochemistry. Joshua D. Rabinowitz (joshr@Princeton.EDU)

ITA319: The Literature of Gastronomy

This course studies Italian novels and short stories in English translation, works of visual art, and films which thematize food as reality and metaphor, examining how eating functions within ideological and mythological structures of modern society. Topics will include ‘Futurist’ cuisine as an aesthetic experience and a prophetic vision, writing during the war, and sublime and erotic cuisine. Daniela B. Antonucci (dantonuc@Princeton.EDU), Pietro Frassica (frassica@Princeton.EDU)

ITA 401: Seminar in Italian Literature and Culture – Italy: The Land of Slow

Combining an analysis of Italian literary texts with works of visual art, this course studies the art of cookery in relation to people’s environment and history. From Middle Ages to the 21st-century (Dante, Boccaccio, Michelangelo, Goldoni, d’Annunzio, Magris), topics will explore the conceptual preconditions that in recent years have generated the Slow-Food movement, its recycling of its own old traditions as well as its worldwide impact. This course examines food as a window into gender, class and traditions, where food is defined in terms of nutritional health and taste as well as social and ethical phenomena, such as the value of nature. Pietro Frassica (frassica@Princeton.EDU)

JRN 454 (LA): Writing Abut Ideas

Journalists play a crucial role in intellectual life. They popularize and challenge the work of scholars and scientists, probe the world views that motivate political actors, and bring philosophical debates to the surface of public life, making the case for their relevance and even their urgency. In this course we will read and study works of intellectual narrative journalism. We will look at writerly strategies for conveying and distilling complexity within storytelling, and we will produce our own journalism. Laura J. Secor (lsecor@princeton.edu)

LAO 210 / LAS 210 / SOC 210 / URB 210: Urban Sociology: The City and Social Change in the Americas

By taking a comparative approach, this course examines the role of social, economic, and political factors in the emergence and transformation of modern cities in the United States and selected areas of Latin America. We consider the city in its dual image: both as a center of progress and as a redoubt of social problems, especially poverty. Attention is given to spatial processes that have resulted in the aggregation and desegregation of populations differentiated by social class and race. Patricia Fernández-Kelly

MOL 460 / STL 460: Diseases in Children: Causes, Costs and Choices
Within a broader context of historical, social, and ethical concerns, a survey of normal childhood development and selected disorders from the perspectives of the physician and the scientist. Emphasis on the complex relationship between genetic and acquired causes of disease, medical practice, social conditions, and cultural values. The course features visits from children with some of the conditions discussed, site visits, and readings from the original medical and scientific literature. Prerequisite: 214 or 215. Two 90-minute classes. Daniel A. Notterman (dan1@Princeton.EDU)

NES265, POL268: Political/Econ Development of Mid-East

Provides a framework for understanding the political and economic issues that both challenge and encourage development in the Middle East and Northern Africa. Students will think creatively about the issues raised by designing a development project aimed at tackling a specific problem in a Middle Eastern country. Two lectures, one preceptorial. M. Künkler

POL 329: Policy Making in America

This course provides a realistic introduction to how public policy is made in the United States today. It examines how people (voters, activists, wealthy individuals, lobbyists, politicians, bureaucrats, and judges), organizations (interest groups, firms, unions, foundations, think tanks, political parties, and the media) and political institutions (Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the judiciary) come together to create and implement public policy. The course combines social science theory and systematic empirical evidence with case studies, and provides students with tools of proven usefulness for practical political analysis. Charles M. Cameron (ccameron@Princeton.EDU)

PSY 252: Social Psychology

The scientific study of social behavior, with an emphasis on social interaction and group influence. Topics covered will include social perception, the formation of attitudes and prejudice, attraction, conformity and obedience, altruism and aggression, and group dynamics. Diana I. Tamir (dtamir@princeton.edu)

PSY 321 / WWS 340: The Psychology of Decision Making and Judgment

An introduction to the logic and research findings underlying decision-making and judgment under uncertainty. The focus is on the contrast between the rational theory of judgment and choice, and the psychological principles that guide decision behavior, often producing biases and errors. Among other topics, we will consider political, medical, and financial decision-making, poverty, negotiation, and the law, along with the implications of the findings for the rational agent model typically assumed in economics, throughout the social sciences, and in policy making. Eldar Shafir (shafir@princeton.edu)

SOC 337: Environment and Migration

Environmental refugees leave their homes in response to earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, droughts, toxins, dams, and deforestation. Risk-mitigating farming households preemptively send family to seek jobs elsewhere, protecting against possible crop failure. In much of the world, households participate in cyclical or temporary migratory flows, driven by seasonality of the food supply. Students will become familiar with the manners in which environment drives migration and explore the potential for migration to impact the environment. Is vulnerability to environmental hazards distributed equitably across the world’s communities? Staff

SOC 542: Complex Organization (Half-Term)

Introduction to the study of complex organizations. Course goals are (1) to familiarize students with classic and recent organizational scholarship; (2) to enable students to apply critical insights from this research to empirical analyses involving organizations; (3) to provide a start on key readings for students planning to take a comprehensive examination in this field. Topics covered include: bureaucracy/pre-bureaucratic forms; contributions of the Carnegie School; economics of organizations & organizational networks; environments and organizational ecology; institutional theory; organizations/inequality; corporations/social change. Paul J. DiMaggio (dimaggio@Princeton.EDU)

SPA 305: Topics in Spanish Civilization of the Golden Age – Gastronomy in Spanish Literature

Cuisine is always more than nutrition; it functions as an agent of identity at both the regional and the national level. Moreover, gastronomy intersects with other manifestations of culture such as painting, literature, medicine, and religion. Readings, in addition to cookbooks, handbooks of table manners, and medical treatises, will include literary texts ranging from medieval to Golden Age to modern. Ronald E. Surtz (surtz@Princeton.EDU)

SWA102: Elementary Swahili II

This course is a continuation of Swahili 101. It enhances communicative skills with emphasis on writing, reading, comprehension and conversation. Class activities review and enhance already introduced skills in speaking, writing, listening and reading; all embedded in authentic and contemporary East African cultural content. Cultural themes include the basics of daily life such as relationships, food, physical features and other aspects of material culture of East Africa. Learners are expected to perform functions related to basic services, comprehension of basic spoken and written texts and writing of a 1-page essay in Kiswahili. Mahiri Mwita (mmwita@Princeton.EDU)

URB 201 / WWS 201 / SOC 203 / ARC 207 Introduction to Urban Studies

This course will examine different crises confronting cities in the 21st century. Topics will range from immigration, to terrorism, shrinking population, traffic congestion, pollution, energy crisis, housing needs, water wars, race riots, extreme weather conditions, war and urban operations. The range of cities will include Los Angles, New Orleans, Paris, Logos, Caracas, Havana, New York, Hong Kong, and Baghdad among others. M. Christine Boyer (mcboyer@Princeton.EDU)

WWS 350 / ENV 350 (STN): The Environment: Science and Policy

This course examines the ways domestic US and international environmental regulatory frameworks adopt, interpret and otherwise accommodate scientific information. The course focuses on several case studies, that provide insights into the science-policy interactions which emerge from managing natural resources and environmental risk. Topics include air pollution; climate change; ozone depletion; managing the world’s forests, fisheries, and ecosystem services, and global trade in wildlife. Students will explore the science underlying these issues as well as current policies and the range of future policy responses. Michael Oppenheimer (omichael@Princeton.EDU), David S. Wilcove (dwilcove@princeton.edu)

WWS 501: The Politics of Public Policy

An analysis of the forces that shape the behavior of public organizations and individuals in organizational settings. The emphasis is on the workings of U.S. governmental agencies. Special attention is given to writing skills as they apply to the roles of advisers and decision makers in public-sector organizations. Laura De Olden (lauradeolden@princeton.edu), Grigore Pop-Eleches (gpop@Princeton.EDU)

WWS 529: Great Leadership in Historical Perspective

Course uses the lens of history to evaluate why some individuals are considered most effective as elected, bureaucratic, and appointed officials in American history. Course evaluates social scientific models of leadership, then delves into the historical record to discover any patterns. Careful consideration is given to the distinct challenges posed by different institutional settings. A wide range of influential leaders, including Gifford Pinchot at the Dept of Agriculture, Lyndon Johnson in the Senate, Wilbur Cohen at the Social Security Administration and George Schultz at State, will be examined. Julian E. Zelizer (jzelizer@princeton.edu)

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